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CBHagman's Journal - Archives
Posted by CBHagman in Latest Breaking News
Sat Sep 03rd 2011, 09:26 AM
...I noticed he was singing from the same page as the rest of the GOP choir. Very disappointing, because initial news stories suggested he would take the high road. But the more I hear from him, the less I think he has anything to distinguish himself from the rest. See below.

http://jon2012.com/campaign/Aug-12-2011/Go...

Governor Jon Huntsman today issued the following statement on the recent ruling on ObamaCare by the Appeals Court of the 11th Circuit:

"The individual mandate included in ObamaCare is an unconstitutional assault on the individual liberty of the American people, and I support today's ruling by the Appeals Court of the 11th Circuit.

"When I was Governor of Utah, I signed free-market healthcare reforms designed to help small businesses and individuals, rather than burden them with mandates, fines and massive bureaucracies.

"As President, I will repeal ObamaCare and put an end to the economic uncertainty that it has created."


There is no such thing as "ObamaCare." That's just a term employed by the kvetching, whingeing, whining, sneering pundits and pols and others who apparently don't care that the U.S. has an overly expensive health care system that makes billionaires of CEOs while impoverishing and sometimes killing people. It's pretty hard to enjoy liberty (or, to state the obvious, life) without access to medical care.

And spare me the "free market" spiel. The free market has no morality, and it doesn't care if you or a loved one are bankrupted due to medical bills or dropped by your insurer during chemotherapy or far, far worse.

As for the promise of repeal, I'd remind Huntsman that spite is not a policy position. It's a character flaw.

Mind you, there is no way he could be as singularly unpleasant as Newt Gingrich or Michele Bachmann, but few people can manage that.
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Posted by CBHagman in Latest Breaking News
Wed Jan 19th 2011, 09:35 PM
That's really the most I can say about them, and they don't deserve anything more.
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Posted by CBHagman in Latest Breaking News
Mon Jan 03rd 2011, 11:57 PM
I just watched the clip. Meh. It's not particularly clever, and the depiction of the church, clergy, and parishioners is generic and vague enough to make it unclear which denomination they are spoofing. It's a rather pointless commercial, bound to offend some, but I assume Frito-Lay is operating on the idea that there's no such thing as bad publicity.

I will say this: There are too many people in this world who think they are being cool and hip and unconfined by convention, when really they are just giving themselves permission to behave like jerks around other people.
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Posted by CBHagman in General Discussion
Tue Dec 21st 2010, 09:34 AM
Time today is short and I'd just like to say this:

The notion of baby boomers being spoiled and coddled is nothing but a myth that's bandied about in the media by those who have spun postwar prosperity, rising numbers receiving post-secondary education, and a plethora of societal shifts (the rise of TV, the advent of reliable contraception, the quest for equal rights for all citizens regardless of race, gender, and sexual orientation) into a fantasy that those born over nearly two decades (George W. Bush on the one end, Obama on the other) are a monolithic group of the greedy and the indulged.

Nothing could be sillier or more untruthful. The generation that brought up the baby boom came out of the Great Depression and the Second World War, and was duly confronted by the Cold War. Their own parents and grandparents were born in the 19th century, and Victorian attitudes cast a surprisingly long shadow over the 20th century.
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Posted by CBHagman in Latest Breaking News
Sat Nov 20th 2010, 12:20 PM
It takes 67 votes to pass it. Look at the makeup of the Senate and do the math.

An August report on NPR:

The new START treaty calls for significant reductions in the deployed nuclear weapons of both countries. But it may have a hard time getting the 67 votes in the Senate required to ratify any treaty.

The treaty was signed by President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in April. Now it's up to the Senate. There have been nearly 20 hearings in the Senate Foreign Relations, Armed Services and Intelligence Committees.

All the while, no treaty and no verification mechanisms are in place to manage the nuclear arsenals of Russia and the United States.


I don't care if Obama invokes Calvin Coolidge or Thomas Dewey or Koko the Clown; just get this thing passed.

But don't take my word for it. Here are the Democratic chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the ranking member, and the secretary of State. See video at the State Department link.

http://blogs.state.gov/index.php/site/entr...

And if you don't know who Senator Richard Lugar (R-IN) is, Google the phrase Nunn-Lugar.

People are using this thread to make knee-jerk cheap shots at the president. I will type the following as many times as I have to on DU: Doing that doesn't prove your progressive bona fides or get a single thing done for the good of the people.

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Posted by CBHagman in General Discussion (1/22-2007 thru 12/14/2010)
Sat Mar 27th 2010, 09:59 PM
During impeachment I remember Charlie Rangel (D-NY) addressing his Republican colleagues: "You have brought hatred to this floor!"

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/12/20/nyregion...

But in retrospect impeachment seems mostly a terrible waste of time and money (and a lot of abuse of less-powerful people, frankly).

But the tea party movement, the all-expenses-paid right wing ego trip movement (e.g., Beck, Limbaugh et al), with their vitriol, their ignorance, their ill-defined but virulent rage, are something more pernicious. They scream, they spit, but it is for a less just nation, and a more divided one.
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Posted by CBHagman in General Discussion: Presidential (Through Nov 2009)
Thu Oct 02nd 2008, 02:32 PM
So Sarah Palin is leaping right into the arms -- or is it the ring of hell? -- occupied by Karl Rove, Lee Atwater, Steve Schmidt, and Richard Nixon. That says more about her character, or the lack of it, and intellectual capacity, or the lack of it, than anything...
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Posted by CBHagman in General Discussion: Presidential (Through Nov 2009)
Tue Sep 30th 2008, 02:39 PM
Mind you, I think Palin is more deserving of censure than of pity. A woman -- or man, for that matter -- of good character, common sense, and patriotism would never put Palin forward for the running mate position. She clearly doesn't have the temperament, the brains, or the experience to serve as president, should it come to that.
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Posted by CBHagman in Latest Breaking News
Sat Sep 13th 2008, 11:31 AM
The record is a little fuzzy, but basically Palin seems to fall on the side of those who believe deregulation and the free market will provide affordable health care (You may pause here to throw up, laugh, or cry).

http://www.ontheissues.org/2008/Sarah_Pali...

I support flexibility in government regulations that allow competition in health care that is needed, and is proven to be good for the consumer, which will drive down health care costs and reduce the need for government subsidies.

This is the exact opposite of national health insurance plan advocate Harry Truman, who was invoked in Palin's RNC speech.

McCain himself has echoed much of the Bush administration spin on health care -- i.e., that cutting people loose from the employer-provided model will empower consumers and the the market will take care of affordability issues.

And McCain advocates medical savings accounts, which strikes me as a damned stupid notion to put forth before the American people when said people's disposable income is going down thanks to high fuel prices and other cost of living expenses.

http://www.johnmccain.com/Informing/Issues...

When families are informed about medical choices, they are more capable of making their own decisions and often decide against unnecessary options. Health Savings Accounts take an important step in the direction of putting families in charge of what they pay for.

Again, putting people at the mercy of the market, invoking responsibility and empowerment while advocating changing the tax code in a way that will likely cause many to lose coverage -- that's the sort of thing we're looking at with the McCain campaign. It's more of what Bush tried and failed to do.

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Posted by CBHagman in General Discussion: Presidential (Through Nov 2009)
Wed Sep 03rd 2008, 12:34 AM
DUers, the GOP is totally relentless and totally shameless and totally hypocritical, and the media generally lets them get away with every last bit of it (excepting perhaps the cases of Bob Packwood and Larry Craig). Be ready for when 'can relatives and co-workers and pundits recycle the Fred Thompson spin from the convention. A quote from ursine old Fred:

Now, speaking of the vice presidential nominee, what a breath of fresh air Governor Sarah Palin is. She's from a small town with small-town values. But apparently that's not good enough for some of the folks who are out there now, attacking her and her family.

"Small-town values." "Good enough." "Attacking her and her family." Suddenly Sarah Palin didn't have the same problems any other family might have, and suddenly it isn't that she flung her teenage daughter on to the front pages of every newspaper in the country. Oh, no, it's those people who are attacking the family. Indeed, the Palins and the GOP are having one big headache as the halos threaten to become too tight!

They are brazening it out and playing martyr. Folks, they want to use this as a PR war -- cynical as hell, and calculating.
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Posted by CBHagman in Latest Breaking News
Tue Sep 02nd 2008, 12:47 PM
...the list.

For crying out loud, McCain wants to risk placing the fate of the free world in the hands of an untested woman with no obvious skills as a national and international leader. I don't much care about the pregnancy issue itself -- it's none of our business, anyway -- but Palin and McCain had to know that the personal life of a 17-year-old girl would be splashed all over front pages and TV screens around the world. What the bloody hell were they thinking? What kind of cold, unfeeling people are they?
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Posted by CBHagman in Editorials & Other Articles
Sun Aug 10th 2008, 10:47 AM
Have you caught him on the stump? He comes off as scripted, sanctimonious, dithery, and mean-spirited all at the same time. If every voter had a chance to glimpse that, he/she wouldn't trust him with a grocery shopping list, let alone foreign policy.
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Posted by CBHagman in Latest Breaking News
Sat Aug 09th 2008, 12:34 AM

There's a huge flaw in the following review: The reviewer rather stupidly sees Hillary Clinton as a Richard Nixon that Barack Obama has already defeated. Nonsense. Note that McCain relies on a Rove protege, Steve Schmidt; has repeatedly gone negative; has a noticeable mean streak ("McNasty" was his high school nickname); and is of course touting his experience.

http://www.economist.com/books/displaystor...

It is hard, in the current political season, to read this book without hearing the sound of history rhyming, to paraphrase Mark Twain. George McGovern's promise of “post-partisanship” galvanised America's youth. He trumpeted his opposition to the Vietnam war under the slogan of “right from the start”. He went on to suffer one of the biggest defeats in the general election in American history. “Dirty politics confused him,” Hunter S. Thompson sighed. Nixon chose “experience counts” as his campaign slogan in 1960 and boasted that he had spent “a lifetime getting ready”.

Alternet already posted this on the Nixon-McCain parallel:

http://www.alternet.org/blogs/election08/9... /

On edit: From Rick Perlstein's book, Nixonland: "Richard Nixon was a serial collector of resentments."

http://books.google.com/books?id=dM_enWzog...
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Posted by CBHagman in The DU Lounge
Fri Aug 08th 2008, 10:30 AM
Yes, that sounds contradictory.

Confidence: I'd learn how to recognize logical fallacies, learn how to disagree without being disagreeable, learn how to stand up to bullies and manipulators, learn to be respectful without being a doormat.

Humility: When I was in my teens and 20s, it was much easier to believe in absolutes and make sweeping generalizations, to indulge in self-absorption, to mistake conformity for harmony.

Life has a way of making you get over all of that.

But the thing is, just like Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, we have to make the journey and learn these lessons for ourselves. If we're lucky, we'll gain wisdom early, but truly, no matter how good one's intentions are, there's no guarantee you'll learn the lessons that early.

Also, frankly, when I was younger, I didn't have the context for everything, and I didn't appreciate what my parents, aunts, grandmother, professors, teachers, and older friends had learned by experience. So to anybody on DU who wants to foment inter-generational warfare, please don't. We need all the minds we can get. We need to tap everyone's perspective.
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Posted by CBHagman in General Discussion: Presidential (Through Nov 2009)
Sun Aug 03rd 2008, 10:20 AM
...that the conventional wisdom that young adults tend to be liberal and their elders conservative doesn't necessarily play out that way ("Why Young Women Are More Conservative," reprinted in Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions). In fact I was more conservative in my teens and early 20s. With exposure to different cultures and ideas, my perspective changed.

One thing that does bother me is that it's still culturally acceptable, at least in the media, to marginalize and denigrate older adults. I've even seen it done by older adults themselves (David Broder, call your damn office). If anything, we all need to explore different perspectives, especially those produced by decades of experience.
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