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joshcryer's Journal - Archives
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Mon Sep 19th 2011, 07:04 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 31 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A Libyan woman displays messages of thanks to England and France for their military and diplomatic support at a rally in Benghazi.

Photo: Philippe Wojazer


Day 213 September 18

Libya ponders when to investigate deep-rooted corruption
As a senior official in Libya’s National Oil Corp., she wrote 50 letters denouncing massive corruption within her own organization, including three to longtime leader Moammar Gaddafi’s powerful son Saif al-Islam.
Libyan children start school year without Gadhafi
Boys and girls chanted anti-Moammar Gadhafi slogans while teachers hung an effigy of the fugitive leader Saturday as Libyan children started their first school year without the "brother leader" dictating everything from the curriculum to what books they should read.
Gaddafi ordered the deaths of senior officials
Libyan Judge Muhammad Bashir al-Khaddar was one of the most prominent judicial figures in Gaddafi’s Libya. Al-Khaddar also served as one of the most senior Libyan military judges in the Gaddafi regime. In an exclusive interview with Asharq Al-Awsat, al-Khaddar revealed many of the Gaddafi regime’s most closely-held secrets.
Defected Libyan pilots return home
The two Libyan pilots who defected to Malta just three days after the Libyan revolution started will today return home to their families, with plans to join the air force under the new Libyan government.
36 interim cabinet members are expected to be announced by NTC at about 16:00 GMT
"What we know for sure is that it will be represented 36 people from different parts of Libya," Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra reporting from Tripoli said.
Malta consolidates ties with new Libya as Gonzi hosts Jalil and Jibril at Castille
Libya’s National Transitional Council (NTC) has assured Prime Minister Lawrence Gonzi that Malta will have a distinguished role in the rebuilding of a new Libya.
Confusion hampering charge on Gaddafi desert bastion
Confused orders, no central command and dissent in the ranks are holding up efforts by Libya's provisional government to take the Muammar Gaddafi bastion of Bani Walid, fighters said.
Libya Islamist takes inclusive stance
Tripoli's military commander, an Islamist whose rise to prominence is being watched closely by the West, said on Sunday he wanted to build a democratic "civil state" in Libya in remarks that laid out an inclusive political vision after 42 years of despotism under Muammar Gaddafi.
Losers in Libya
No matter how long it takes to find Muammar Gaddafi, it is now relatively easy to draw up a scorecard on the six-month conflict in Libya and anoint the winners and losers. The biggest winners are, of course, the Libyan people who, with the help of the international community, rode the wave that started in Tunisia and Cairo and overthrew their own dictator. Whatever the final outcome of the current turmoil in the country, it can hardly be worse than the previous 42 years.
Benghazi, Libya: A city in foul disrepair, euphoric that other world powers intervened
Benghazi may possess the most soulless cityscape on the Mediterranean, full of boxy new buildings that lack any architectural motif or sense of place and new dwellings with all the charm of high rises in Communist East Germany. "They're like prisons" says Ali Tarhouni, the new regime's finance and oil minister, of housing being built by Chinese contractors.
Peacefare - So far so good
Free Libya seems to me headed in the right direction. It could still be diverted, in particular if Qaddafi manages to raise an insurgency or if the revolutionary militias fall out with each other and begin internecine fighting. But the National Transitional Council (NTC seems to have won the battle with TNC) has legitimacy in the eyes of every Libyan I’ve talked with. They like the roadmap to elections and the constitution the NTC has laid out, they like what they regard as its uncorrupted leadership, and they have confidence that things will improve because of Libya’s vast oil and gas resources.
Building a democratic nation will be hard work
FOR decades, the possibility of a Libya without Muammar Gadhafi seemed just a dream. But today, Tripoli’s central square is adorned with the three colours of the pro-democracy forces’ flag. The once-omnipresent pictures of Gadhafi are gone. As that regime gasps its last breath, the Libyan people and the National Transitional Council (NTC) are writing the first chapter of a free Libya.


Day 214 September 19

Tony Blair 'visited Libya to lobby for JP Morgan'
Tony Blair used visits to Libya after he left office to lobby for business for the American investment bank JP Morgan, The Daily Telegraph has been told.
Libyans fail to agree on new government
Libya's interim leaders failed to agree a new cabinet on Sunday in the latest setback to attempts to normalise the running of a government still bogged down by battles with pro-Muammar Gaddafi forces
Defected pilots get warm welcome Tripoli - video
Two Libyan air force pilots made a joyful return to Tripoli. They have been out of the country since February. They say they were given orders to bomb anti-government protesters but, horrified, they chose to defect instead and flew to Malta.
NATO to end combat operation in Libya
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization will end its combat operation and transfer power in Libya within the next 3 months, officials say.
Gulf likely to trim oil output as Libya recovers
Gulf OPEC countries will likely gradually decrease their output as Libya's production recovers towards pre-war levels after raising output to compensate for the Libyan loss, the oil group's Libyan Secretary General Abdullah al-Badri said on Monday.
Libyan Provisional Authority Facing Stalled Military, Political Efforts
Libya's provisional authority is facing military and political challenges, as fighters have met continued resistance in former leader Moammar Gadhafi's remaining strongholds and National Transitional Council leaders have delayed announcing a new government.
Who is Abdel Hakim Belhaj? - video
In Libya, new figures are emerging in political and military circles during this transitional period; some even command wide appeal.
OPEC recognises NTC as Libyan representative
The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries now recognises Libya's National Transitional Council as its OPEC representative, the oil group's Secretary General Abdullah al-Badri said on Monday.
Firm sold Gaddafi stealth 4X4
A French company provided Libya in 2008 with a specialised 4X4 designed to protect Muammar Gaddafi while he travelled, and the French presidency signed off on the deal, Mediapart reported online on Sunday.
Total CEO eyes Libyan business expansion
Total SA is in talks with Libya's interim leaders about expanding its business in the North African country, the French oil major's chief executive told a German newspaper.
Libya revolution filters slowly to desert towns
The tumultuous change of power in far-off Tripoli was for weeks little more than a rumor in this small sun-baked town deep in Libya's desert, its news brought in by travelers down the long, desolate ribbon of highway that links Schwerif to the outside world.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 86 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (96 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sun Sep 18th 2011, 09:27 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 31 part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A Libyan woman displays messages of thanks to England and France for their military and diplomatic support at a rally in Benghazi.

Photo: Philippe Wojazer


Day 212 September 17

Libya Has Historic Day at UN
It was a dramatic day for Libya at the United Nations. In the morning, the National Transitional Council, which now governs the country, was granted the Libyan seat in the General Assembly hall.
Libya Counts More Martyrs Than Bodies
Where are all the dead? Officially, according to Libya’s new leaders, their martyrs in the struggle against the government of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi should number 30,000 to 50,000, not even counting their enemies who have fallen.
Libyan forces plot moves after Bani Walid setback
Libyan revolutionary fighters are struggling to regroup outside the loyalist stronghold of Bani Walid after being driven back by fierce resistance from followers of Moammar Gadhafi.
Libya rebels punch into Sirte as civilians flee
NTC forces swept further into Sirte on Saturday as at least 6,000 fighters battled in and around the hometown of fugitive Moammar Gadhafi, one of the ousted Libyan leader's last strongholds.
In Libya, Turk PM woos with one eye on history
Hundreds of Libyans joined Turkey's Tayyip Erdogan in prayer on Friday in Tripoli, heaping praise on him for backing the revolt against Muammar Gaddafi.
Gaddafi's spokesman: NATO air strikes kill 354 in Sirte
Muammar Gaddafi's spokesman told Reuters on Saturday that NATO air strikes on Sirte overnight had hit a residential building and a hotel, killing 354 people.
Niger won’t hand over Gadhafi regime members without guarantees of safety
Members of Moammar Gadhafi’s regime who have sought refuge in Niger will not be turned back to Libya without guarantees for their safety, the Niger government spokesman said Friday.
President Obama to Meet leader of Libya's Interim Government Abdul-Jalil in New York
United States President Barack Obama will meet Libya's interim leader, Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly in New York on Tuesday, the White House has announced.
NATO to assess claims of civilian casualties in Sirte, Libya
NATO said on Saturday it would assess allegations that its airstrikes had killed hundreds of civilians in the under-siege Libyan city of Sirte, but noted that similar accusations in the past have rarely proven to be true, DPA reported.
Defected Libyan pilots to return to Libya
Two Libyan air force pilots who defected to Malta with their Mirage jet fighter planes last February are to return to Tripoli tomorrow.
The Arab Autumn: Three Big Challenges Threatening the Arab Uprisings
With the fall of Muammar Qaddafi's headquarters in Bab Al-Aziziyyah in Tripoli on August 23, Libya became the third country to oust its long-serving dictator after the fall of Tunisia's Zein-al-bedin Ben Ali and Egypt's Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.
Libyan women: it's our revolution too
They smuggled bullets in handbags, tended wounded fighters, cooked meals for frontline units, sold their jewellery to buy combat jeeps and sewed the flags that fly in liberated cities. But with the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi almost complete, many Libyan women are asking whether it's their revolution too.
Libya's Revolution Produces a New Hybrid: Pro-Western Islamists
The Libyan rebels chuckle when they find a child-size T-shirt featuring a cartoon of Osama bin Laden amid the surveillance files, tapes and photos in one of the buildings abandoned by Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's internal security forces. Sporting thick, bushy beards in a fresh show of religiosity they say never would have been tolerated under the old regime, they have mixed feelings about the man on the T-shirt. "Fighting in the name of Islam is something that all Muslims respect," says Mukhtar Enhaysi, carefully. "But when makes explosions and commits acts of terrorism against civilians who have nothing to do with that, no one agrees with that."
Seeking victors’ laurels
DAVID Cameron and Nicolas Sarkozy were at pains to stress they had not come to Libya in search of lucrative reconstruction contracts and easy-terms oil deals. Their tone in Tripoli on Thursday was far too high-minded for that. But in truth, like self-styled conquering heroes through history, the British and French leaders arrived in hot pursuit of victors’ laurels that may, in time, produce a handy financial payback. This was, first and foremost, the Dave and Sarko spoils of war tour.


Day 213 September 18

Libya ponders when to investigate deep-rooted corruption
As a senior official in Libya’s National Oil Corp., she wrote 50 letters denouncing massive corruption within her own organization, including three to longtime leader Moammar Gaddafi’s powerful son Saif al-Islam.
Libyan children start school year without Gadhafi
Boys and girls chanted anti-Moammar Gadhafi slogans while teachers hung an effigy of the fugitive leader Saturday as Libyan children started their first school year without the "brother leader" dictating everything from the curriculum to what books they should read.
Gaddafi ordered the deaths of senior officials
Libyan Judge Muhammad Bashir al-Khaddar was one of the most prominent judicial figures in Gaddafi’s Libya. Al-Khaddar also served as one of the most senior Libyan military judges in the Gaddafi regime. In an exclusive interview with Asharq Al-Awsat, al-Khaddar revealed many of the Gaddafi regime’s most closely-held secrets.
Defected Libyan pilots return home
The two Libyan pilots who defected to Malta just three days after the Libyan revolution started will today return home to their families, with plans to join the air force under the new Libyan government.
36 interim cabinet members are expected to be announced by NTC at about 16:00 GMT
"What we know for sure is that it will be represented 36 people from different parts of Libya," Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra reporting from Tripoli said.
Losers in Libya
No matter how long it takes to find Muammar Gaddafi, it is now relatively easy to draw up a scorecard on the six-month conflict in Libya and anoint the winners and losers. The biggest winners are, of course, the Libyan people who, with the help of the international community, rode the wave that started in Tunisia and Cairo and overthrew their own dictator. Whatever the final outcome of the current turmoil in the country, it can hardly be worse than the previous 42 years.
Benghazi, Libya: A city in foul disrepair, euphoric that other world powers intervened
Benghazi may possess the most soulless cityscape on the Mediterranean, full of boxy new buildings that lack any architectural motif or sense of place and new dwellings with all the charm of high rises in Communist East Germany. "They're like prisons" says Ali Tarhouni, the new regime's finance and oil minister, of housing being built by Chinese contractors.
Peacefare - So far so good
Free Libya seems to me headed in the right direction. It could still be diverted, in particular if Qaddafi manages to raise an insurgency or if the revolutionary militias fall out with each other and begin internecine fighting. But the National Transitional Council (NTC seems to have won the battle with TNC) has legitimacy in the eyes of every Libyan I’ve talked with. They like the roadmap to elections and the constitution the NTC has laid out, they like what they regard as its uncorrupted leadership, and they have confidence that things will improve because of Libya’s vast oil and gas resources.
Building a democratic nation will be hard work
FOR decades, the possibility of a Libya without Muammar Gadhafi seemed just a dream. But today, Tripoli’s central square is adorned with the three colours of the pro-democracy forces’ flag. The once-omnipresent pictures of Gadhafi are gone. As that regime gasps its last breath, the Libyan people and the National Transitional Council (NTC) are writing the first chapter of a free Libya.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 86 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (92 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Fri Sep 16th 2011, 10:13 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 30 part 4 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Vendors sold Kingdom of Libya souvenirs in front of the residence of Colonel Qaddafi at the Bab al-Aziziya complex in Tripoli.

Photo: Suhaib Salem / Reuters


Day 210 September 15

NATO balks at Libya nation-building, policing
NATO, which has been bogged down for nearly 10 years in Afghanistan and more than 12 in Kosovo, is desperately seeking a mission it can end, quickly, cleanly and for good.
UK, French leaders visit Libya; peace still far off
The French and British leaders will visit Libya on Thursday to congratulate the new rulers they helped install, but families fleeing besieged bastions of ousted strongman Muammar Gaddafi are a reminder that peace is still far off.
Sky News Revisits Newly-Liberated Tripoli Suburb
Souk al Juma is a Tripoli suburb which formed part of the backbone of the underground opposition - a place where Colonel Gaddafi tried to brutally suppress the uprising.
U.S. not concerned that extremists will dominate in Libya
Based on our discussions with Libyans so far, we aren't concerned that one group is going to be able to dominate the aftermath of what has been a shared struggle by the Libyan people.
Libya watching fools of Allah
Can we rule out a takeover by the Islamists in Libya? Undoubtedly meet the revolutionaries. "These are young people, civilians, who launched this movement with peaceful demonstrations. No one will steal your revolution. If the Islamists ever arrive at the head of the country, we get rid of it as we got rid of Qaddafi," Abdul ensures Oubashit, a doctor of 29 years back to Tripoli after caring for five months, the rebels at the border Tunisia.
African Union 'within days' of recognizing NTC
South African diplomatic sources told the Telegraph that African Union was "within days" of recognising NTC-led interim government. South Africa, a member of the UN Security Council said it would then remove objections to a British sponsored resolution to ease the sanctions regime on Libya.
Why NATO's mission in Libya isn't over yet
The pro-Qaddafi activists that claim NATO has long ago overstepped it's stated mission of protecting civilians and have really been engaged in "regime change" have one big problem, Qaddafi, from before UN resolution 1973 was passed until even today, has never stopped endangering and wantonly killing civilians.


Day 211 September 16

BREAKING NEWS: NATO shouldn't be trusted by Libyans!
Today British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy were in Tripoli to bask in the glory of a successful campaign to remove the murderous dictator Mummar Qaddafi from power. For once, they did a good deed in stopping Qaddafi from using his air force, navy and heavy weapons to massacre the people of Benghazi, Misrata and Tripoli and they claim that their actions were motivated only by humanitarian concerns. This is certainly not the case.
The NTC flag has been raised on a government building in Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte
The National Transitional Council flag has been raised on a government building in Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte, according to both al-Arabiya and al-Jazeera Arabic.
Libyan forces pull back after Bani Walid battles
Revolutionary forces are pulling back their fighters from outside a key loyalist stronghold after coming under fierce resistance from supporters of Moammar Gadhafi.
UN approves Libya seat for former rebels
The U.N. General Assembly voted Friday to give Libya's seat in the world body to the former rebels' National Transitional Council which led the rebellion that ousted Moammar Gadhafi.
UN Security Council Eases Sanctions On Libya
The UN Security Council has voted to ease sanctions on Libya to help the country rebuild following its civil war.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 86 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Veitnam (September 14).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (92 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Thu Sep 15th 2011, 07:27 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 30 part 3 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libyans flash the victory sign in front of a rebel Libya flag during a celebration rally at Martyrs' square in Tripoli

Photo: Reuters


Day 209 September 14

Civilians flee pro-Gaddafi town ahead of assault
Libyan fighters handed out free petrol to help hundreds of civilians flee a desert town held by Muammar Gaddafi's forces ahead of an onslaught aimed at capturing one of the ousted ruler's last bastions.
Libya's new rulers to probe war crimes allegations
LIBYA's new rulers promised to investigate allegations of "serious abuses" including war crimes as their position was consolidated when the World Bank recognised them as the official government.
Tripoli's new normal - bickering politicians
Less than a month after Muammar Gaddafi's fall, Tripoli is bustling. Shoppers throng markets. Banks are open. Electricity and water are back, most of the time. Out in the desert, some oil flows.
Freedoms Flourish On Walls Across Tripoli
Caricatures of the ousted Gadhafi have sprung up all over Tripoli. This image of Gadhafi in chains is on a wall
in the capital's Fashlum neighborhood.

Freed of Gadhafi, Libyans expect post-war boom
Airlines are readying their return to Libya, ports largely shuttered during the fighting are receiving cargos and foreign oil companies that had fled the country's civil war are making tentative steps back.
Senior U.S. diplomat holds talks in Tripoli
Libya's new interim leader met the most senior U.S. official to visit Tripoli since the fall of Muammar Gaddafi, though details of Wednesday's talks were not immediately available.
Sky News Tracks Down 'Abducted' Girl In Tripoli
Sky News has tracked down a young woman who was taken from England by her Libyan father without her mother's consent 19 years ago.
HRW: Libya: Mass Grave Yields 34 Bodies
Thirty-four bodies exhumed from a mass grave near the town of al-Qawalish in western Libya seem to be those of men detained by pro-Gaddafi forces in early June 2011, Human Rights Watch said today.
Envoy vows US will not meddle in post-Kadhafi Libya
Senior US State Department official Jeffrey Feltman said after talks in Tripoli on Wednesday that Washington respected the right of Libyans to decide their own future after the ouster of Moamer Kadhafi.
Burkina Faso and Niger Back Gaddafi's Victims
There is good news in the world of international justice: Burkina Faso and Niger have said unequivocally that they will not give safe haven to former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi - who may be seeking a new place to call home. The two governments cited the outstanding warrant issued for him by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for crimes committed against the Libyan people.
THE BATTLE FOR LIBYA: Killings, Disappearances and Torture (PDF)
Inspired and emboldened by anti-government protests sweeping across the Middle East and North Africa region, Libyans called for 17 February 2011 – the fifth anniversary of a brutal crackdown on a public protest in Benghazi – to be their “Day of Rage” against Colonel Mu’ammar al-Gaddafi’s four-decade long repressive rule.
Doctor's song of freedom inspires Libyans
We Will Stay Here, a ballad by Adel Al Mshiti, a 38-year-old doctor, has dominated the Libyan airwaves for the past six months. It's played at every demonstration, in every taxi and every shop in Libya's recently liberated capital. "We will stay here," go the song's lyrics, "until the pain goes away." "We will live here, the melody will sweeten," urging Libyans to stay in the country and endure the oppressive conditions under dictator Moammar Gadhafi. You may view the song on YouTube here.
Libya's Freedom Fighters: How They Won
Now that Tripoli is more or less secure, more stories are coming out that help us understand how the Libyan freedom fighters were able to achieve such a rapid victory over Mummar Qaddafi in his capital of 42 years. I want to use today's diary to share with you some of the more enlightening material I have found.


Day 210 September 15

NATO balks at Libya nation-building, policing
NATO, which has been bogged down for nearly 10 years in Afghanistan and more than 12 in Kosovo, is desperately seeking a mission it can end, quickly, cleanly and for good.
UK, French leaders visit Libya; peace still far off
The French and British leaders will visit Libya on Thursday to congratulate the new rulers they helped install, but families fleeing besieged bastions of ousted strongman Muammar Gaddafi are a reminder that peace is still far off.
Sky News Revisits Newly-Liberated Tripoli Suburb
Souk al Juma is a Tripoli suburb which formed part of the backbone of the underground opposition - a place where Colonel Gaddafi tried to brutally suppress the uprising.
U.S. not concerned that extremists will dominate in Libya
Based on our discussions with Libyans so far, we aren't concerned that one group is going to be able to dominate the aftermath of what has been a shared struggle by the Libyan people.
Libya watching fools of Allah
Can we rule out a takeover by the Islamists in Libya? Undoubtedly meet the revolutionaries. "These are young people, civilians, who launched this movement with peaceful demonstrations. No one will steal your revolution. If the Islamists ever arrive at the head of the country, we get rid of it as we got rid of Qaddafi," Abdul ensures Oubashit, a doctor of 29 years back to Tripoli after caring for five months, the rebels at the border Tunisia.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 83 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (107 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Tue Sep 13th 2011, 11:32 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 30 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libyan revolutionnary supporters react as Libyan Transitional National Council chairman Mustafa Abdel Jalil delivers his speech at the Martyrs' Square in Tripoli, Libya, Monday, Sept. 12, 2011.

Photo: Francois Mori / AP


You can view AJE's report on this speech here.

Day 207 September 12

Gaddafi forces attack refinery, kill 15 - witnesses
Forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi attacked the front gate of an oil refinery near the Libyan coastal town of Ras Lanuf on Monday, killing 15 guards and injuring two, witnesses said.
Libya: So far, so pretty good
Amid trepidation, the new regime is making a remarkably hopeful start
Exclusive: Libyan woman guided NATO bombs to Gaddafi targets
The NATO bombing campaign which fatally weakened Muammar Gaddafi's rule had a secret asset: a 24-year-old Libyan woman who spent months spying on military facilities and passing on the details to the alliance.
Darfur rebel leader Khalil Ibrahim flees Libya
The leader of Darfur's main Justice and Equality Movement (Jem) rebel group, Khalil Ibrahim, has returned from exile in Libya.
Libya music scene reborn after years of suppression
Patriotic songs composed by Libyan rebels during their revolt against Muammar Qadhafi fill the air every evening in Benghazi’s Tahrir Square. After years of censorship under his ousted regime, a new music scene is taking off.
Fighting continues at Bani Walid as civilians flee
Fugitive leader Moammar Gadhafi urged his followers to fight on Monday in a brief message of defiance that carried wider resonance after twin attacks on a key oil hub and fierce resistance in a loyalist stronghold by fighters believed led by the former Libyan ruler's son.
Internet Spy Room Found In Tripol
From protests precipitated by Facebook posts to internet censoring by authoritarian regimes technology has played a prominent role in the world’s recent moments of social unrest. We all know that the governments of Iran and Egypt and Libya eavesdrop when their citizens talk, but to listen in on Yahoo chat or Skype they needed help. Where that help came from might surprise you. Companies in the UK, Germany, France, the US and other countries in the West have sold software to regimes that enable them to spy on their citizens – ironically the same regimes those countries are now trying to topple.
Civilian Volunteers Brace War-Crippled Libya
Adel Ahmed, a strongly built, bearded man in a brown cap and t-shirt, commands a coterie of guards at a security checkpoint along the road between Misrata and Sirte.
Eyewitness: life inside ‘The Hotel’, Libya’s most dreaded jail
A father close to his family, who is fond of writing and poetry. He wrote something himself once, a short, factual account which he titled rather deceptively, The Hotel. The story tells of one morning when Ahmed Albousifi woke up full of the joys of life. It was January 1989 and Ahmed remembers the smell of fresh coffee and the cold winter air full of the fragrance of flowers from his garden.
Libya faces many problems getting oil online
I have spent the last ten days touring Libya’s oil facilities, and interviewing the country’s new oil officials and executives from the oil services companies. As I left the country, Libya was getting ready to start producing some oil again, the first step on a long process to return to the pre-war output level of 1.6m barrels a day.


Day 208 September 13

Libya's revolutionary leader calls for civil state
The chief of Libya's revolutionary movement has addressed a crowd of thousands in a landmark square in central Tripoli, calling for a democratic state with strong civic institutions.
Jalil's speech from a Libyan on AJE
Mustafa Abdul Jalil speech was really powerful and for sure he made Libyan people very happy
Residents flee Gaddafi town, food dwindles
Residents -- those who had enough fuel for their cars, at least -- trickled steadily out of the town on Monday, vehicles packed with as many passengers as possible, children stacked up on people's laps, belongings strapped to the roofs.
Libya's new leader calls for civil state - video
The chief of Libya's transitional government urged a cheering crowd in Tripoli to strive for a civil, democratic state, while loyalists of fugitive leader Muammar Gaddafi killed at least 15 opposition fighters in an attack on a key oil town in Libya's east.
A Woman on Libya’s Front Lines
The rebel fighter, in a billowing white “Free Libya” T-shirt, jeans, scarf and camouflage cap, was leaning against a car, talking in a businesslike manner with other rebels.
Exclusive: Secrets Of Saif Gaddafi's Home
Sky News has exclusively uncovered evidence showing Saif al Islam Gaddafi's influence over the Libyan army.
Libya war threatens spiral of rights abuse: Amnesty
Amnesty said anti-Gaddafi soldiers were also guilty of human rights abuses, although on a smaller scale.
Libya's transitional leader pledges no extremism
The leader of Libya's Transitional National Council said in Tripoli that it will rule without 'extremist ideology,' reports said Tuesday.
NATO airstrikes pound pro-Gadhafi targets in Libya
NATO warplanes pounded targets in a number of strongholds of support for fugitive dictator Moammar Gadhafi, the alliance said Tuesday, as an offensive by revolutionary forces on a key loyalist town stalled.
Oil tanker waits off Libya for loading instruction
An oil tanker is waiting off Libya for loading instructions, the owner of the vessel said on Tuesday.
Libya's siege town: Sniper nests and empty shops
The streets are now no man's lands. Stores were emptied of food and water days ago. Expert snipers on rooftops watch over one of the last strongholds of Moammar Gadhafi's rule.
Police, missile defence top Tripoli security priorities
The main security challenge for Tripoli is integrating the fighters who toppled Muammar Gaddafi into the police force to build the revolution's "legitimacy", an official of the interim administration said on Tuesday.
Women volunteers proudly do their bit for Libya revolution
Bursting with revolutionary pride and armed with brooms and paintbrushes, every day a group of Libyan women from all walks of life meet at a Tripoli square before fanning out to clean up the capital and paint pro-revolution wall murals.
Carpet salesman leads hunt for Gadhafi
Three weeks after Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi was driven out of Tripoli, effectively ending his 42-year reign, his would-be successor addressed a cheering crowd of thousands in what used to be called Green Square, the now renamed Martyrs’ Square.
Clock ticking on Gaddafi bastion's last stand
Wary of alienating a powerful local tribe, fighters backing Libya's new rulers are urging families to leave the besieged town of Bani Walid before resorting to full-scale military force to take one of Muammar Gaddafi's last strongholds.
Racism in Libya by Clay Claiborne
Arab prejudice against blacks has a long and ignoble history. Racism against Africans has been a problem of long standing in Libya. Whereas progressives see the current revolutionary situation in Libya as an opportunity to combat this disease and build a new unity between Africans and Arabs free at last from Qaddafi's meddling, some pro-Qaddafi "left" groups are attempting to use Libyan racism, both real and exaggerated, to attack the revolution. They do this by denying that racism was ever a problem under Qaddafi and "discovering" it among those they still insist on calling the "rebels."





Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 83 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (94 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Mon Sep 12th 2011, 07:19 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 30 part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libya youth designs a graffiti depicting Moammar Gadhafi on a wall in Tripoli, Libya.

Photo: AP


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 203 September 8

Fighters head towards showdown with pro-Gaddafi town
Libya's new rulers sent a column of extra fighters towards the tribal bastion of Bani Walid overnight, preparing a showdown with supporters of ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi, possibly including his sons or even Gaddafi himself.
Libya: The Price of Freedom
This year, Libya has lost an estimated 50,000 men in its six month revolt. That is a staggering amount in a sparsely populated desert nation of only 6.4 million people.
How Qaddafi defaced Tripoli, former jewel of the Med
For Tripoli residents, the legacy of Colonel Muammar Qaddafi is embodied in the city's architecture: a Mediterranean jewel defaced by four decades of dictatorship and mismanagement.
Gaddafi loyalists 'forced to kill' by soldiers
At least 1,000 former loyalists have been detained since the city fell. Some have been telling the BBC how they were forced to commit appalling crimes to defend their leader.
Getting to Know the Opposition - Who did the world recognize?
The transitional government emerged as four pillars: National Transitional Council (NTC), The Executive Board (TEB), the Libya Stabilization Team, and The Local Councils.
Heat-Seeking Missiles Are Missing From Libyan Arms Stockpile
The sign on the wall reads "Schoolbook Printing and Storage Warehouse," but the fact that the double gates in the wall have been crudely ripped off suggests that something more interesting might be inside.
Libyan Transitional Government Rejects Koussa Role
Libya's transitional government has rejected an attempt by Moussa Koussa, the former foreign minister, to take a role in the new administration in Tripoli, The (London) Times reported Thursday.
Gaddafi shows no signs of surrender
Gaddafi calls on Libyans in a new audio message to take up arms against rebel 'traitors'.
Libyans start to dream of political parties
As Libya's new leaders work on setting the country right and eliminating the last holdouts of Moamer Kadhafi's loyalists, budding politicians are looking forward to the planned elections.
5 Things To Know About Libya's Missing Antiaircraft Missiles
CNN originally reported that shoulder-mounted SA-24s have gone missing in Libya. But arms control experts now tell PM that there's no evidence of gripstocks for the missiles in Libya. That means that any SA-24s looted from Gaddafi's stockpiles could be vehicle-fired, but not shoulder-fired. This makes them less of a terrorist threat.
'Eyes of the world were on NATO,' Canadian general says
Sacking the capital would have to be entirely a rebel initiative. "It was clear that we (NATO) couldn't take Tripoli. You can't do it from 30,000 feet."
Libyan estimate: At least 30,000 died in the war
At least 30,000 people were killed and 50,000 wounded in Libya's six-month civil war, the interim health minister said, offering a first detailed estimate of the high cost in lives of bringing down Moammar Gadhafi.
Libyan central bank sells gold, says assets all safe
Libya's central bank, under control of the country's new leaders, said on Thursday none of its assets had been stolen and that it had sold 29 tonnes of gold to help pay salaries.
In a New Libya, Ex-Loyalists Race to Shed Ties to Qaddafi
"There are very few instances of revenge," said Abdulmajeed el-Dursi, the former chief of the Qaddafi-era foreign media operation, sipping coffee at a cafe full of rebels and talking about opening a media services company.
Libya plans shake-up of oil sector
Libya's interim government is drafting a proposal that would shrink the responsibilities of the National Oil Corp (NOC) to make it a purely commercial organisation, a member of the interim government has told Reuters.
Libya power struggle threatens post-Gaddafi unity
Libya's internationally backed interim council has yet to establish a credible administration in Tripoli, where makeshift armed brigades united only by the six-month struggle against Muammar Gaddafi are now jostling for influence.
Gaddafi regime sold 20 percent of Libya's gold reserves to cover salaries
In Tripoli Thursday, the new governor of Libya's central bank told reporters the former regime sold about 20 percent - or 29 tons - of the country's gold reserves to cover salaries during the uprising.
Special Libyan unit hunting down Gadhafi
Determined to hunt down Moammar Gadhafi, Libya's new rulers say they have dedicated a special unit of fighters to track the elusive former leader, listening in on his aides' phone calls, poring over satellite images and interviewing witnesses.


Day 204 September 9

'We fight for Muammar. We fight for Libya. He protected our country'
"We should capture him, put him in a cage and put it on television. That is the only thing that will convince some of these people (in Bani Walid) he is finished, otherwise this will carry on."
Rebels say Gadhafi loyalists holding hostages outside Sirte
Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi have moved hundreds of hostages to a village outside Sirte in what appear to be preparations for a final violent stand, officials of the National Transitional Council said Thursday.
Libya rebels scrambling to secure Kadafi arsenals
Moammar Kadafi's regime moved its weapons stockpiles as NATO unleashed airstrikes in March. Now, rebels have the tough task of finding and securing the caches, some of which have been looted.
At Libyan Embassy in Kyiv, Gadhafi persona non grata
A white, silk sheet hung loosely over a couch, reads “Libyans are not rats, Libyans are patriots and brave people.”
Unbelievable crowd reaction to Tamazight song in the Martyrs' Square in Tripoli
I was not aware, but the Tamazight language was banned under Gaddafi. Spoken by the indigenous Amazigh people.
Mercenaries used by Gaddafi return home penniless
Suliman one of Gaddafei’s mercenaries from Niger says, “I fought for Gaddafi, they promised me 5000 Euros but got nothing and now I am sick and penniless”, he has returned to Niger after he fled from the ranks of the forces loyal to Gaddafi, which was defeated in the ongoing battles in past months by the Freedom Fighters.
An Iraqi exile gives outlet to Gadhafi's voice
Moammar Gadhafi may be on the run, but he's still talking — and his outlet is a curious one: clandestine, late-night phone calls to a private Syrian satellite TV station run by an Iraqi exile with a shady past.
Anti-Gaddafi forces enter loyalist town of Bani Walid
Fighters representing Libya's new rulers encircled and entered Bani Walid, one of the last towns loyal to ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi on Friday, and fought with gunmen in street-to-street battles.
Gaddafi loyalists burn key files in Sabha
Libyan officials claim that the Gaddafi elite have destroyed crucial files from the Civil and Estate in Sabha, one of the few cities that remains under Gaddafi control. National Transitional Council (NTC) media committee member, Abdel Hameed Adam, told the Quryna newspaper that Gaddafi loyalists, including mercenaries from the Justice and Equality movement, had also vandalised the Sabha International airport to prevent planes from landing. Libyan rebels have attacked wells at the South Company, which are owned by Saleh Al-Qadhafi. Some injuries were sustained among the rebels.


Day 205 September 10

Fight for Bani Walid 'near end' - video
Heavy fighting has broken out near the town of Bani Walid, with National Transitional Council commanders saying they are close to capturing the town from Gaddafi loyalists.
Libyans find mass grave, bodies of slain detainees
Al-Alagi, the justice minister, alleged that the orders for the killings came from the top. At the least, he said, brigade commanders would be brought to justice.
Libya: 19 Suffocated in Gaddafi Detention
The discovery on September 8, 2011, of 18 bodies buried in western Libya corroborates reports of the death by suffocation of detainees held by Gaddafi forces in June in the town of al-Khoms, Human Rights Watch said today. Another victim died a few days later, so was not buried with the other 18.
Libya fighters battle for Gaddafi-held Bani Walid
Libyan fighters trying to capture one of Muammar Gaddafi's last strongholds battled into the desert town of Bani Walid on Saturday against stiff resistance from Gaddafi loyalists.
NATO Airstrikes Rock Gadhafi Stronghold in Libya
NATO airstrikes have rocked Libya's desert town of Bani Walid, one of the last remaining strongholds for Moammar Gadhafi's supporters.
Libya battles rage after deadline expiry
NTC fighters seek to wrest Bani Walid, Sirte and Sabha after Gaddafi loyalists ignore deadline to surrender.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 83 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (114 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sat Sep 10th 2011, 12:20 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 29 part 5 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libya youth designs a graffiti depicting Moammar Gadhafi on a wall in Tripoli, Libya.

Photo: AP


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 203 September 8

Fighters head towards showdown with pro-Gaddafi town
Libya's new rulers sent a column of extra fighters towards the tribal bastion of Bani Walid overnight, preparing a showdown with supporters of ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi, possibly including his sons or even Gaddafi himself.
Libya: The Price of Freedom
This year, Libya has lost an estimated 50,000 men in its six month revolt. That is a staggering amount in a sparsely populated desert nation of only 6.4 million people.
How Qaddafi defaced Tripoli, former jewel of the Med
For Tripoli residents, the legacy of Colonel Muammar Qaddafi is embodied in the city's architecture: a Mediterranean jewel defaced by four decades of dictatorship and mismanagement.
Gaddafi loyalists 'forced to kill' by soldiers
At least 1,000 former loyalists have been detained since the city fell. Some have been telling the BBC how they were forced to commit appalling crimes to defend their leader.
Getting to Know the Opposition - Who did the world recognize?
The transitional government emerged as four pillars: National Transitional Council (NTC), The Executive Board (TEB), the Libya Stabilization Team, and The Local Councils.
Heat-Seeking Missiles Are Missing From Libyan Arms Stockpile
The sign on the wall reads "Schoolbook Printing and Storage Warehouse," but the fact that the double gates in the wall have been crudely ripped off suggests that something more interesting might be inside.
Libyan Transitional Government Rejects Koussa Role
Libya's transitional government has rejected an attempt by Moussa Koussa, the former foreign minister, to take a role in the new administration in Tripoli, The (London) Times reported Thursday.
Gaddafi shows no signs of surrender
Gaddafi calls on Libyans in a new audio message to take up arms against rebel 'traitors'.
Libyans start to dream of political parties
As Libya's new leaders work on setting the country right and eliminating the last holdouts of Moamer Kadhafi's loyalists, budding politicians are looking forward to the planned elections.
5 Things To Know About Libya's Missing Antiaircraft Missiles
CNN originally reported that shoulder-mounted SA-24s have gone missing in Libya. But arms control experts now tell PM that there's no evidence of gripstocks for the missiles in Libya. That means that any SA-24s looted from Gaddafi's stockpiles could be vehicle-fired, but not shoulder-fired. This makes them less of a terrorist threat.
'Eyes of the world were on NATO,' Canadian general says
Sacking the capital would have to be entirely a rebel initiative. "It was clear that we (NATO) couldn't take Tripoli. You can't do it from 30,000 feet."
Libyan estimate: At least 30,000 died in the war
At least 30,000 people were killed and 50,000 wounded in Libya's six-month civil war, the interim health minister said, offering a first detailed estimate of the high cost in lives of bringing down Moammar Gadhafi.
Libyan central bank sells gold, says assets all safe
Libya's central bank, under control of the country's new leaders, said on Thursday none of its assets had been stolen and that it had sold 29 tonnes of gold to help pay salaries.
In a New Libya, Ex-Loyalists Race to Shed Ties to Qaddafi
"There are very few instances of revenge," said Abdulmajeed el-Dursi, the former chief of the Qaddafi-era foreign media operation, sipping coffee at a cafe full of rebels and talking about opening a media services company.
Libya plans shake-up of oil sector
Libya's interim government is drafting a proposal that would shrink the responsibilities of the National Oil Corp (NOC) to make it a purely commercial organisation, a member of the interim government has told Reuters.
Libya power struggle threatens post-Gaddafi unity
Libya's internationally backed interim council has yet to establish a credible administration in Tripoli, where makeshift armed brigades united only by the six-month struggle against Muammar Gaddafi are now jostling for influence.
Gaddafi regime sold 20 percent of Libya's gold reserves to cover salaries
In Tripoli Thursday, the new governor of Libya's central bank told reporters the former regime sold about 20 percent - or 29 tons - of the country's gold reserves to cover salaries during the uprising.
Special Libyan unit hunting down Gadhafi
Determined to hunt down Moammar Gadhafi, Libya's new rulers say they have dedicated a special unit of fighters to track the elusive former leader, listening in on his aides' phone calls, poring over satellite images and interviewing witnesses.


Day 204 September 9

'We fight for Muammar. We fight for Libya. He protected our country'
"We should capture him, put him in a cage and put it on television. That is the only thing that will convince some of these people (in Bani Walid) he is finished, otherwise this will carry on."
Rebels say Gadhafi loyalists holding hostages outside Sirte
Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi have moved hundreds of hostages to a village outside Sirte in what appear to be preparations for a final violent stand, officials of the National Transitional Council said Thursday.
Libya rebels scrambling to secure Kadafi arsenals
Moammar Kadafi's regime moved its weapons stockpiles as NATO unleashed airstrikes in March. Now, rebels have the tough task of finding and securing the caches, some of which have been looted.
At Libyan Embassy in Kyiv, Gadhafi persona non grata
A white, silk sheet hung loosely over a couch, reads “Libyans are not rats, Libyans are patriots and brave people.”
Unbelievable crowd reaction to Tamazight song in the Martyrs' Square in Tripoli
I was not aware, but the Tamazight language was banned under Gaddafi. Spoken by the indigenous Amazigh people.
Mercenaries used by Gaddafi return home penniless
Suliman one of Gaddafei’s mercenaries from Niger says, “I fought for Gaddafi, they promised me 5000 Euros but got nothing and now I am sick and penniless”, he has returned to Niger after he fled from the ranks of the forces loyal to Gaddafi, which was defeated in the ongoing battles in past months by the Freedom Fighters.
An Iraqi exile gives outlet to Gadhafi's voice
Moammar Gadhafi may be on the run, but he's still talking — and his outlet is a curious one: clandestine, late-night phone calls to a private Syrian satellite TV station run by an Iraqi exile with a shady past.
Anti-Gaddafi forces enter loyalist town of Bani Walid
Fighters representing Libya's new rulers encircled and entered Bani Walid, one of the last towns loyal to ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi on Friday, and fought with gunmen in street-to-street battles.
Gaddafi loyalists burn key files in Sabha
Libyan officials claim that the Gaddafi elite have destroyed crucial files from the Civil and Estate in Sabha, one of the few cities that remains under Gaddafi control. National Transitional Council (NTC) media committee member, Abdel Hameed Adam, told the Quryna newspaper that Gaddafi loyalists, including mercenaries from the Justice and Equality movement, had also vandalised the Sabha International airport to prevent planes from landing. Libyan rebels have attacked wells at the South Company, which are owned by Saleh Al-Qadhafi. Some injuries were sustained among the rebels.


Day 205 September 10

Fight for Bani Walid 'near end' - video
Heavy fighting has broken out near the town of Bani Walid, with National Transitional Council commanders saying they are close to capturing the town from Gaddafi loyalists.
Libyans find mass grave, bodies of slain detainees
Al-Alagi, the justice minister, alleged that the orders for the killings came from the top. At the least, he said, brigade commanders would be brought to justice.
Libya: 19 Suffocated in Gaddafi Detention
The discovery on September 8, 2011, of 18 bodies buried in western Libya corroborates reports of the death by suffocation of detainees held by Gaddafi forces in June in the town of al-Khoms, Human Rights Watch said today. Another victim died a few days later, so was not buried with the other 18.
Libya fighters battle for Gaddafi-held Bani Walid
Libyan fighters trying to capture one of Muammar Gaddafi's last strongholds battled into the desert town of Bani Walid on Saturday against stiff resistance from Gaddafi loyalists.
NATO Airstrikes Rock Gadhafi Stronghold in Libya
NATO airstrikes have rocked Libya's desert town of Bani Walid, one of the last remaining strongholds for Moammar Gadhafi's supporters.
Libya battles rage after deadline expiry
NTC fighters seek to wrest Bani Walid, Sirte and Sabha after Gaddafi loyalists ignore deadline to surrender.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 83 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (121 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion: Presidency
Thu Sep 08th 2011, 09:21 PM
Reapportionment Act of 1929
The Reapportionment Act of 1929 (ch. 28, 46 Stat. 21, 2 U.S.C. § 2a, enacted June 18, 1929) was a combined census and reapportionment bill passed by the United States Congress that established a permanent method for apportioning a constant 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives according to each census. The bill neither repealed nor restated the requirements of the previous apportionment acts that districts be contiguous, compact, and equally populated.

The Act of 1929 gave little direction concerning congressional redistricting. It merely established a system in which House seats would be reallocated to states which have shifts in population. The lack of recommendations concerning districts had several significant effects.

The Reapportionment Act of 1929 allowed states to draw districts of varying size and shape. It also allowed states to abandon districts altogether and elect at least some representatives at large, which several states chose to do, including New York, Illinois, Washington, Hawaii, and New Mexico. For example, in the 88th Congress (in the early 1960s) 22 of the 435 representatives were elected at-large.


This has had an astounding, breathtaking effect on American politics over the last century. Politicians went from being representatives of a group of people to being businessmen whose whims have been increasingly manipulated by lobbyists.


The U.S. population has increased more rapidly than the membership of the House of Representatives.


United States congressional apportionment
The current size of 435 seats means one member represents on average about 709,760 people; but exact representation per member varies by state. Three states – Wyoming, Vermont, and North Dakota – have populations smaller than the average for a single district.

The "ideal" number of members has been a contentious issue since the country's founding. George Washington agreed that the original representation proposed during the Constitutional Convention (one representative for every 40,000) was inadequate and supported an alteration to reduce that number to 30,000.


In the end the left has the influence necessary to take the country in the right direction. But as the lobbying link shows, even we are incapable of moving the country in that direction because our influence is mitigated heavily by these groups.

I'm not against lobbying in principle, however, what good is lobbying when those who are being lobbied do not represent the population as a whole? In fact, incapable of representing the population as a whole? How can one person represent over five hundred thousand people? They can't. The overall influence of lobbyists (those who work for corporations as opposed to small businesses or political action groups) would be highly diminished if they had to lobby 5,000 to 10,000 representatives! Meanwhile the influence of the left would be greatly increased!

Repeal the Reapportionment Act of 1929! For democracy! For the people! For fair representation!
Read entry | Discuss (10 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Thu Sep 08th 2011, 05:49 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 29 part 4 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libyan rebels waited at night on the side of the road on the outskirts of Bani Walid.

Photo: Bryan Denton for The New York Times


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 202 September 7

New authorities outline priorities for UN support to post-conflict Libya
The new Libyan authorities have requested United Nations support for several post-conflict tasks, including elections, transitional justice and national reconciliation, according to a senior UN official who is in Tripoli to begin laying the groundwork for the world body's operations.
Attack on Gaddafi stronghold 'imminent'
Negotiations for peaceful surrender of Bani Walid, southeast of Tripoli, fail as negotiators from town are fired at.
Libya: asylum talks begin as Gaddafi loyalists flee across border
Secret diplomatic moves were under way to enable Col Muammar Gaddafi to leave Libya and seek temporary asylum in a sympathetic country.
Gaddafi last tracked in southern Libya - Libyan official
Muammar Gaddafi has probably left the Libyan town of Bani Walid and is heading further south with the help of loyalist tribes towards Chad or Niger, a senior military official in Libya's new leadership told Reuters late on Tuesday.
Libyan Rebels Press Gains as Some Loyalists Are Said to Flee
Rebel negotiators pressed fighters loyal to Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi in the town of Bani Walid to surrender on Tuesday amid reports of loyalists fleeing the country and confusion over the whereabouts of the former Libyan leader.
Libya Oil Chief Sacks Suspected Gadhafi Loyalists In joint ventures
Libya's new oil chief Nuri Berruien has started to replace suspected loyalists of the regime of Col. Moammar Gadhafi, starting with managers of foreign joint-ventures, people familiar with the matter said this week.
Libya combs priceless ruins for war damage
Libyan archaeologists are beginning to inspect the country's priceless historical sites, hoping part of their cultural heritage and economic future has not been ruined by war.
Happy homecoming for Libyan footballers
Huge crowds gathered in Benghazi on Monday, as the Libyan national football team returned home to a hero's welcome.
Libya's Weapons Problem
There is a plethora of weapons in Libya, and experts are concerned that arms could make their way into neighboring countries?and possibly fall into Al Qaeda's grasp.
Kadafi loyalists fled to Niger by convoy, U.S. affirms
The size of the convoy is in dispute. The news of the crossing fuels suspicion that a secret pact was reached to allow Moammar Kadafi to escape, but rebels say they are confident he remains in Libya.
The terrified decade
Ten years on, however, it is clear from the response to Libya's brutal repression of anti-government protesters that the "with us or with the terrorists" rhetoric deployed by Muammar Gaddafi could not be relied on as a trump card to be played by a head of state at any moment of their choosing.
British envoy offers olive branch to torture victim
A day after arriving in Tripoli to re-establish a diplomatic mission there, Britain's new envoy to Libya said yesterday that he would meet Abdelhakim Belhaj, the Libyan rebel leader who told The Independent that MI6 knew he was being tortured and did nothing to stop it.
Libyan fighters say Gadhafi surrounded
Libyan fighters have surrounded the ousted dictator Moammar Gadhafi, and it is only a matter of time until he is captured or killed, a spokesman for Tripoli's new military council said Wednesday.
Niger's north, desert bolt-hole for Libya's losers
Already awash with bandits, ex-rebel nomads and a growing number of al Qaeda-linked gunmen, Niger's desert north is now the main escape route south from the war in Libya -- and could yet emerge as Muammar Gaddafi's bolt-hole.


Day 203 September 8

Fighters head towards showdown with pro-Gaddafi town
Libya's new rulers sent a column of extra fighters towards the tribal bastion of Bani Walid overnight, preparing a showdown with supporters of ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi, possibly including his sons or even Gaddafi himself.
Libya: The Price of Freedom
This year, Libya has lost an estimated 50,000 men in its six month revolt. That is a staggering amount in a sparsely populated desert nation of only 6.4 million people.
How Qaddafi defaced Tripoli, former jewel of the Med
For Tripoli residents, the legacy of Colonel Muammar Qaddafi is embodied in the city's architecture: a Mediterranean jewel defaced by four decades of dictatorship and mismanagement.
Gaddafi loyalists 'forced to kill' by soldiers
At least 1,000 former loyalists have been detained since the city fell. Some have been telling the BBC how they were forced to commit appalling crimes to defend their leader.
Getting to Know the Opposition - Who did the world recognize?
The transitional government emerged as four pillars: National Transitional Council (NTC), The Executive Board (TEB), the Libya Stabilization Team, and The Local Councils.
Heat-Seeking Missiles Are Missing From Libyan Arms Stockpile
The sign on the wall reads "Schoolbook Printing and Storage Warehouse," but the fact that the double gates in the wall have been crudely ripped off suggests that something more interesting might be inside.
Libyan Transitional Government Rejects Koussa Role
Libya's transitional government has rejected an attempt by Moussa Koussa, the former foreign minister, to take a role in the new administration in Tripoli, The (London) Times reported Thursday.
Gaddafi shows no signs of surrender
Gaddafi calls on Libyans in a new audio message to take up arms against rebel 'traitors'.
Libyans start to dream of political parties
As Libya's new leaders work on setting the country right and eliminating the last holdouts of Moamer Kadhafi's loyalists, budding politicians are looking forward to the planned elections.
5 Things To Know About Libya's Missing Antiaircraft Missiles
CNN originally reported that shoulder-mounted SA-24s have gone missing in Libya. But arms control experts now tell PM that there's no evidence of gripstocks for the missiles in Libya. That means that any SA-24s looted from Gaddafi's stockpiles could be vehicle-fired, but not shoulder-fired. This makes them less of a terrorist threat.
'Eyes of the world were on NATO,' Canadian general says
Sacking the capital would have to be entirely a rebel initiative. "It was clear that we (NATO) couldn't take Tripoli. You can't do it from 30,000 feet."
Libyan estimate: At least 30,000 died in the war
At least 30,000 people were killed and 50,000 wounded in Libya's six-month civil war, the interim health minister said, offering a first detailed estimate of the high cost in lives of bringing down Moammar Gadhafi.
Libyan central bank sells gold, says assets all safe
Libya's central bank, under control of the country's new leaders, said on Thursday none of its assets had been stolen and that it had sold 29 tonnes of gold to help pay salaries.
In a New Libya, Ex-Loyalists Race to Shed Ties to Qaddafi
"There are very few instances of revenge," said Abdulmajeed el-Dursi, the former chief of the Qaddafi-era foreign media operation, sipping coffee at a cafe full of rebels and talking about opening a media services company.
Libya plans shake-up of oil sector
Libya's interim government is drafting a proposal that would shrink the responsibilities of the National Oil Corp (NOC) to make it a purely commercial organisation, a member of the interim government has told Reuters.
Libya power struggle threatens post-Gaddafi unity
Libya's internationally backed interim council has yet to establish a credible administration in Tripoli, where makeshift armed brigades united only by the six-month struggle against Muammar Gaddafi are now jostling for influence.
Gaddafi regime sold 20 percent of Libya's gold reserves to cover salaries
In Tripoli Thursday, the new governor of Libya's central bank told reporters the former regime sold about 20 percent - or 29 tons - of the country's gold reserves to cover salaries during the uprising.
Special Libyan unit hunting down Gadhafi
Determined to hunt down Moammar Gadhafi, Libya's new rulers say they have dedicated a special unit of fighters to track the elusive former leader, listening in on his aides' phone calls, poring over satellite images and interviewing witnesses.




Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 78 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (107 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Mon Sep 05th 2011, 06:19 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 29 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Thousands of women gather in Martyr's square to mark the end of Gaddafi's rule.

Photo: Al Jazeera


Al Jazeera's Evan Hill took this picture of a traffic jam of cars heading to Martyrs' square to join the celebrations. The lights in the background are Martyrs' square.

Photo: Al Jazeera


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 199 September 4

Secret files: Labour lied over Gaddafi... who warned of a holy war if Megrahi died in Scotland
The startling extent to which Labour misled the world over the controversial release of the Lockerbie bomber is exposed today in top-secret documents obtained by The Mail on Sunday. ... But the confidential papers show that Westminster buckled under pressure from Colonel Gaddafi, who threatened to ignite a 'holy war' if Megrahi died in his Scottish cell.
Libya power struggle blacks out embassy (Canberra, Australia)
THE Libyan embassy in Canberra has survived death threats and the loss of its government, but it might be the electricity bill that finally breaks it.
MI5 spied on Libyan torture victims, documents reveal
MI5 also agreed to trade information with Libyan spymasters on 50 British-based Libyans judged to be a threat to Gaddafi's regime.
Five international oil firms back on ground in Libya
Nayed, who also is Libya's ambassador to the United Arab Emirates, insisted that Libya's rebel-led National Transitional Council would respect past contracts and not rush into any new deals.
Libya rebels poised to attack Gadhafi stronghold
Libyan rebels are poised to attack one of Moammar Gadhafi's remaining strongholds, but their military spokesman said Sunday he expected the town's tribal leaders to surrender rather than see their divided followers fight one another.
Tripoli: after the fall
In the city's notorious Abu Salim prison it lingers eerily behind its concrete walls and heavy steel gates. So overpowering is its presence at one of the killing grounds used by the Libyan Army's dreaded Khamis Brigade, that it makes you gag with nausea. They say that of all the senses, smell can trigger recognition, emotion, fear, like no other, and that is certainly true when it comes to the odour of death.
Ex-Gaddafi 'Nun' Reveals Perverse Regime Secrets
An ex-Gaddafi Revolutionary Committee member, or what he likes to call "nun," speaks out of the disturbing, sick and ruthless behavior Muammer Gaddafi has committed in the last four decades. Gaddafi called many of his female personal guards or members nuns because he usually refused for them to get married and have children. Her stories are extremely disturbing, but shed a necessary light on what this evil demon has done for years from raping young boys and girls to kidnappings and murders. Must watch from start to finish.
How did a Scotland-supporting son of Wester Hailes join Libya's rebels?
RAGAB BALLALI is talking about the scariest moment of his life. "There was one time, just before we took Brega, where we could see these troops in front of us," he says in his broad Edinburgh accent. "They were firing at us, and suddenly this rocket-propelled grenade came ricocheting past between me and the guy next to me and exploded right above us."
A Libyan Prisoner Lives to Tell His Story
HE was my confidential source in the Libyan military this spring, an officer who passed on secret information about disaffection in the ranks of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi. And then as the Libyan revolution spread, he made bombs and smuggled weapons into Tripoli to help overthrow the Qaddafi government.
Gaddafi kept the corpse in cold storage for over 30 years
1980 killed several people by Muammar Gaddafi and his forces. Cells was never found. Now they have found - in a cold room in Tripoli. I was really hard to believe that it was true, says Al-Mahdi El Harati, leader of the opposition's strength in Tripoli to Aftenposten.


Day 200 September 5

'Day from hell': Detainees on both sides suffer in Libya
There has been little credible evidence of rebels killing or systematically abusing captives during the six-month conflict. Still, the African Union and Amnesty International have protested the treatment of blacks inside Libya, saying there is a potential for serious abuse.
China Sought to Sell Arms to Qaddafi, Documents Suggest
In the final weeks of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi's battle with Libyan rebels, Chinese state companies offered to sell his government large stockpiles of weapons and ammunition in apparent violation of United Nations sanctions, officials of Libya's transitional government said Sunday.
To Celebrate Holy Month's End, Libya Rebels Open Government Offices to Public
After the Muslim holy month of Ramadan ends with the Id al-Fitr holiday, Libyan employers traditionally throw a reception for their workers. On Sunday, the interim rebel government decided to make its reception a little different and declared an open house.
Nigeria, South Africa in cold war over Gaddafi's fate
A cold war is brewing between Nigeria and South Africa over the fate of the embattled Libyan leader, Muammar Gaddafi.
Libya's new civilian leaders rein in military commanders, Islamist influence
Libya's new civilian leaders put all military commanders in the capital under their control Saturday, a move designed to rein in Islamist influence and paper over internal tensions.
Water back on in most parts of Tripoli
The deputy mayor of Tripoli says tap water is flowing again in most parts of the capital after a two-week outage that disrupted the lives of hundreds of thousands people.
Libya rebels hold off on attacking Gadhafi bastion
Thousands of rebel fighters closed in around one of Libya's last pro-Gadhafi strongholds Monday, but held back on a final assault in hopes of avoiding a bloody battle for the town of Bani Walid.
Libya mission closer to end: Rasmussen
NATO's mission in Libya has moved significantly closer to success and will end soon, the military alliance's secretary general said on Monday.
Gaddafi Libya stresses forgiveness, Muslim theologian runs stabilisation team
When the officials guiding Libya's post-Gaddafi transition list their most urgent tasks, they talk about supplying water, paying salaries or exporting oil, and then add something quite different ? fostering reconciliation. The focus on forgiveness might have seemed out of place at meetings in Paris on Thursday and Friday where world leaders and Libya's new administration discussed problems of democracy, investment and the unblocking of Libyan funds held abroad.
The Voice of Libya An inspiring story of citizen journalism.
"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle." As Libyan freedom fighters entered Tripoli on August 21, my Twitter feed lit up with tweets about Libya and Gaddafi?even if people couldn't quite agree which of some 112 transliterations of his name to make the hashtag.




Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 78 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (96 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sun Sep 04th 2011, 10:56 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 29 part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Thousands of women gather in Martyr's square to mark the end of Gaddafi's rule.

Photo: Al Jazeera


Al Jazeera's Evan Hill took this picture of a traffic jam of cars heading to Martyrs' square to join the celebrations. The lights in the background are Martyrs' square.

Photo: Al Jazeera


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 198 September 3

Moussa Koussa's secret letters betray Britain's Libyan connection
Messages found in his office show how MI6 gave details of dissident exiles to Gaddafi ? and how the CIA used regime for rendition
Juan Cole: Qaddafi was a CIA Asset
Human Rights Watch found documents in Libya after the fall of Muammar Qaddafi that it passed on to the Wall Street Journal, which is analyzing them.
Libyans return to Misrata's devastated main street
Just months after the siege of Misrata, this port city is bustling. Stores are open, water is running and there is steady electricity ? a sharp contrast to Libya's recently conquered capital just 125 miles (200 kilometers) away.
Gadhafi turns water project into a weapon
Moammar Gadhafi's retreating loyalists have cut off water supplies to Tripoli, the rebel-held capital, from the Great Man-Made River, a $33 billion system he built to tap into a vast underground aquifer in the Sahara to sustain his arid country.
Libyans focus on reconciliation and rebuilding
Libya's new leadership reaffirmed its commitment to democracy on Friday and worked on its priorities for spending billions of dollars released from the frozen assets of fugitive strongman Muammar Gaddafi.
United Nations team arrives in Libya
A U.N. team was on the ground in Libya to re-establish the organization's presence there amid dire water, food and fuel shortages, the United Nations said Friday.
Libya's other wealth: Archaeological treasures
Before Moammar Gadhafi, there were the Phoenicians. And the Greeks. The Romans. The first Arabs. They're a reminder that no civilization -- and no leader -- is forever.
NTC launches institutional corruption investigations
Jalil added that investigations are underway to expose any institutional corruption in Libya and cities that have not joined the revolution have been given a one week notice to do so, head of Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC)
Libya: Gaddafi sons and loyalist convoys 'have fled strongholds'
Rebel leaders in town of Tahouna say convoys seen leaving military bases ahead of assault on town expected in days
CIA, MI6 helped Gaddafi on dissidents-HRW
More recent documents showed that after the war broke out six months ago, Libya reached out to a former rebel group in the breakaway Somali state of Puntland, the Somali Salvation Front, asking them to send 10,000 fighters to Tripoli to help defend Gaddafi.
Libyan team wins in 1st game since fall of Gadhafi
Playing its first game since the fall of Moammar Gadhafi, Libya's national soccer team beat Mozambique 1-0 Saturday in an African Cup of Nations qualifier.
Libya's Interim Leaders Aim to Harness Rebel Fighters
Libya's interim government plans to begin bringing irregular rebel militias under government control, either disbanding them or incorporating them into regular police and military forces, said Ali Tarhouni, the deputy chairman of the rebels' executive board, speaking at a news conference here on Saturday.
Khamis Gaddafi and the mystery of Jeremy Bowen's notebook
Khamis Gaddafi, or one of his close military aides, wrote reminders to himself in the black-covered, A5-sized book as he planned what seem to be the final battles, earlier this month, for towns near the city of Zliten.
The Song of Libya's Revolution: A Bombmaking Businessman Comes Up with a Hit
He made bombs that the rebels used in their six-month revolution against Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. He helped defuse explosives the deposed leader's loyalists planned to plant in civilian areas of the capital of Tripoli after his fall. But Masoud Bwisir may be most loved by his people for his guitar-playing skills. He penned the song "My Nation Will Remain Strong," which has become the national anthem for a people who have searched for new national symbols to propel their cause.
Libya will only become inclusive when women are given a say in its future
At this week's conference on Libya in Paris, the Libyan National Transitional Council (NTC) and the international community talk about "inclusiveness" in the new country's future. It seems strange, then, that half of the population - women - seem to be excluded from the discussions on the future of their country.

New Libya will be a country of reconciliation, tolerance and rule of law, the head of the Libyan National Transitional Council (NTC), Mustafa Abdel Jalil, promised to the international community. "The Friends of Libya", that were gathered at the Elysee Palace, in turn promised their full support for the Libyan transition but stressed that this process must be fully managed and implemented by the Libyan people.


Day 199 September 4

Secret files: Labour lied over Gaddafi... who warned of a holy war if Megrahi died in Scotland
The startling extent to which Labour misled the world over the controversial release of the Lockerbie bomber is exposed today in top-secret documents obtained by The Mail on Sunday. ... But the confidential papers show that Westminster buckled under pressure from Colonel Gaddafi, who threatened to ignite a 'holy war' if Megrahi died in his Scottish cell.
Libya power struggle blacks out embassy (Canberra, Australia)
THE Libyan embassy in Canberra has survived death threats and the loss of its government, but it might be the electricity bill that finally breaks it.
MI5 spied on Libyan torture victims, documents reveal
MI5 also agreed to trade information with Libyan spymasters on 50 British-based Libyans judged to be a threat to Gaddafi's regime.
Five international oil firms back on ground in Libya
Nayed, who also is Libya's ambassador to the United Arab Emirates, insisted that Libya's rebel-led National Transitional Council would respect past contracts and not rush into any new deals.
Libya rebels poised to attack Gadhafi stronghold
Libyan rebels are poised to attack one of Moammar Gadhafi's remaining strongholds, but their military spokesman said Sunday he expected the town's tribal leaders to surrender rather than see their divided followers fight one another.
Tripoli: after the fall
In the city's notorious Abu Salim prison it lingers eerily behind its concrete walls and heavy steel gates. So overpowering is its presence at one of the killing grounds used by the Libyan Army's dreaded Khamis Brigade, that it makes you gag with nausea. They say that of all the senses, smell can trigger recognition, emotion, fear, like no other, and that is certainly true when it comes to the odour of death.
Ex-Gaddafi 'Nun' Reveals Perverse Regime Secrets
An ex-Gaddafi Revolutionary Committee member, or what he likes to call "nun," speaks out of the disturbing, sick and ruthless behavior Muammer Gaddafi has committed in the last four decades. Gaddafi called many of his female personal guards or members nuns because he usually refused for them to get married and have children. Her stories are extremely disturbing, but shed a necessary light on what this evil demon has done for years from raping young boys and girls to kidnappings and murders. Must watch from start to finish.
How did a Scotland-supporting son of Wester Hailes join Libya's rebels?
RAGAB BALLALI is talking about the scariest moment of his life. "There was one time, just before we took Brega, where we could see these troops in front of us," he says in his broad Edinburgh accent. "They were firing at us, and suddenly this rocket-propelled grenade came ricocheting past between me and the guy next to me and exploded right above us."
A Libyan Prisoner Lives to Tell His Story
HE was my confidential source in the Libyan military this spring, an officer who passed on secret information about disaffection in the ranks of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi. And then as the Libyan revolution spread, he made bombs and smuggled weapons into Tripoli to help overthrow the Qaddafi government.
Gaddafi kept the corpse in cold storage for over 30 years
1980 killed several people by Muammar Gaddafi and his forces. Cells was never found. Now they have found - in a cold room in Tripoli. I was really hard to believe that it was true, says Al-Mahdi El Harati, leader of the opposition's strength in Tripoli to Aftenposten.




Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 73 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (101 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sat Sep 03rd 2011, 04:00 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 28 part 3 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Thousands of women gather in Martyr's square to mark the end of Gaddafi's rule.

Photo: Al Jazeera (video here)


Al Jazeera's Evan Hill took this picture of a traffic jam of cars heading to Martyrs' square to join the celebrations. The lights in the background are Martyrs' square.

Photo: Al Jazeera


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 196 September 1

Gaddafi son Saif al-Islam vows continued resistance
Muammar Gaddafi's son, Saif al-Islam, on Wednesday vowed continued resistance to Libyan forces which ousted his father from Tripoli and urged Libyans to wage a war of attrition against the National Transitional Council and its NATO backers.
Tripoli's sudden fall revealed rotten heart of Gaddafi's regime
They were elite, professionally trained troops guarding a critical source of the regime's power: the headquarters of Libya's propaganda-spewing state television.
Libya's Moammar Gadhafi reportedly tells TV station loyalist tribes are armed, won't surrender
A TV station is quoting Moammar Gadhafi as warning that tribes loyal to him in key strongholds are armed and won't surrender to Libyan rebels. Al-Rai says Gadhafi will issue a statement and quotes him as saying "we won't surrender again; we are not women; we will keep fighting."
Libya buys 50,000 T Russian wheat - trade
Libya has bought 50,000 tonnes of Russian wheat, a grain tracking firm said on Thursday, indicating commercial deals are picking up after months of war and that Moscow may not suffer from not supporting the fight to oust leader Muammar Gaddafi.
Gaddafi Vows To Engulf Libya In Flames
Defiant Muammar Gaddafi has called on his supporters to fight on and engulf Libya "in flames".
Analysis: Battle for Libya not quite over
Ten days ago the vanguard of rebel forces streamed into the Libyan capital. Moammar Gadhafi's forces put up virtually no resistance and it seemed that the end of Libya's six-month conflict was imminent.
Give victorious rebels Libya's U.N. seat-Clinton
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Thursday that Libya's interim leaders should be given the country's United Nations seat but they should also work with their former foes.
Libya Transformation Laid Out at Paris Meeting
With Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi effectively overthrown, representatives of some 60 nations gathered here Thursday at a Friends of Libya conference, aimed at helping the new Libyan authorities restore stability and a functioning economy to a country ravaged by rebellion and 42 years of dictatorship.
Libya fighters look for desert showdown with Gaddafi
Their guns trained on the barren desert and eyes fixed on the hazy horizon, anti-Gaddafi fighters patrolling the edge of the ousted leader's last stronghold in Libya say they are ready for their final battle.
Thank You, America!
Americans are not often heroes in the Arab world, but as nonstop celebrations unfold here in the Libyan capital I keep running into ordinary people who learn where I'm from and then fervently repeat variants of the same phrase: "Thank you, America!"
Who really beat Qaddafi?
Now that it is clear that the 42 year reign of Mummar Qaddafi has come to an end and there is little left to do on the military side beyond putting down a few pockets of pro-Qaddafi resistance, the question of bragging rights to this victory seems to be coming to the fore in certain western circles.
'Embedding' with Libya's Freedom Fighters
Spending time with Libya's revolutionary brigades is fascinating, both for the light it sheds on a Libya deformed by 42 years of a bizarre dictatorship and for the reflections it inspires on the American military.
Libya's Amazigh Minority
After a cumulative two months in Libya, I've come to believe that the fears of an Iraq-style post-Qaddafi fragmentation are misplaced. Many Libyans express the wish to kill Qaddafi?but not his fighters. This augurs well for the future of this closely knit, small-population country. Even ethnic tensions here are at a lower key, with the Berber minority seeking cultural freedom but not separatism.
As Gaddafi falls - Lessons from Libya - imperialism, anti-imperialism & democratic revolution
The sudden end of the Gaddafi regime some 6 months after the start of the Libyan revolt leaves some difficult questions unanswered for the left. Gaddafi's determination to physically crush the revolt quickly transformed it into a civil war, a civil war that saw considerable imperialist intervention on the rebel side, intervention that was essential to their eventual victory.


Day 196 September 2

African Union reassured by Libyan council promises
The African Union is encouraged by promises made by Libya's transitional council at a conference in Paris on Thursday and will now discuss with its member states the possibility of recognising the interim leadership, a senior official said.
Gaddafi sons face last stand in Libya
Saif, Saadi and Mutassim Gaddafi 'holed up in Bani Walid' while rebels track underground escape route to find dictator
American joins ranks of Libya's rebels
When the war started in Libya, Jamal Abed was working in the restaurant of a hotel in San Antonio. Just over six months later, the 28-year-old Libyan American was among the victorious rebel fighters who stormed Tripoli and took over the capital.
Libya's NTC outlines 20-month democratic road map
A council tasked with drafting a constitution for Libya should be elected within eight months ahead of presidential and legislative polls in early 2013, a rebel leadership official said Friday.
Black migrants now live in fear in Libya
Rebels suspect the young men of being mercenaries for Kadafi. But the terrified sub-Saharans say they were merely laborers.
Gaddafi's Philippine maids appeal for help
The Philippine government said on Friday four Filipina maids who had been working for deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's family were missing and had made a tearful call home for help.
Libyan Islamist says he won't be enemy of U.S.
He says he was tortured by the CIA and accused of links with al-Qaeda, but Tripoli's new military commander, Abdulhakim Belhadj, insists that he is no extremist or enemy of the United States.
Gadhafi regime's long-held secrets opening to view
The hurried exit from power by Moammar Gadhafi and his supporters has left a vast trove of documents that, after decades of being hidden from public view, are now open to the bereaved, the angry and the curious.
Libyans pledge democracy as they win Gaddafi billions
Libya's new leadership reaffirmed its commitment to democracy and good governance on Friday as it worked on how to spend billions of dollars released from the frozen assets of fugitive strongman Muammar Gaddafi.
Libya rebel commander contends was tortured, rendered by CIA
The top Libyan rebel military commander in Tripoli, Abdel Hakim Belhaj, dropped something of a bombshell in an interview with the New York Times yesterday: In 2004, he said, two CIA agents tortured him in Thailand and then "rendered" him to Libya. From that point on, he maintains, he was held in solitary confinement for the next six years.
Americans Emerge After Months In Gadhafi's Prisons
Last week, Matthew VanDyke, a freelance journalist and travel writer from Baltimore, went from solitary confinement in one of Moammar Gadhafi's most notorious prisons to one of Tripoli's most luxurious hotels.
Claims of Mass Libyan Looting Rejected by Archaeologists
Archaeologists in contact with colleagues in Libya say that their nation's antiquities appear safe despite the chaos in the country. That news is contrary to reports earlier this week, which claimed that Libya's museums were being plundered and sites destroyed in NATO bombing raids. Libya boasts a host of ancient Phoenician and Roman sites, as well as major collections of ancient artifacts in Tripoli's Jamahiriya Museum and other smaller museums around the country. So the claims of damage prompted fears of a replay of Baghdad in 2003, when the famous Iraq Museum was looted. But Western archaeologists and Libyan sources say that there is no evidence that such destruction is taking place.
Tripoli Resident Recalls Gadhafi's Early Days
Many in Tripoli are still stunned by the events of the past ten days, which saw their long-time leader Moammar Gadhafi swept from power. On the edge of Tripoli's main square, where Gadhafi had planned to hold his 42 anniversary in power Thursday, one resident of the Libyan capital shared his views with VOA's Elizabeth Arrott and Japhet Weeks.
Rebels Yank Open Gates of Infamous Libyan Prison, Seeking Clues to a Massacre
The liberators of Abu Salim prison came swinging sledgehammers. The inmates flashed victory signs, locks fell, a crowd cheered and the doors swung open. "Political prisoners!" hollered one of the liberators as he captured the moment in video with his cellphone. "This is the famous prison!" he screamed. "This is the terrifying prison!"
The Rebels' Secret Collaborators in Gaddafi's Tripoli
In June, when Walid Tarsin heard that rebels in the city of Zintan (150 km southwest of Tripoli) were short on medicine and hospital supplies, the pharmacist decided to act. He canvassed the hospitals in Tripoli, stealthily gathering all the provisions he could without arousing too much suspicion. He filled up his Mercedes with the contraband and set forth from the capital to make the two-and-a-half-hour journey between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. in the afternoon.




Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 73 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (107 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Thu Sep 01st 2011, 03:13 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 28 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libyans chanted slogans against Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi as they celebrated Id al-Fitr and the rebel takeover of Tripoli during a gathering in the newly renamed Martyrs' Square, formerly known as Green Square in central Tripoli.

Photo: Moises Saman for The New York Times


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 194 August 30

US film-maker held in Libyan jails for six months describes his joy at release
Matthew VanDyke, from Baltimore, who thought he would never see freedom again is staying on until three friends are release.
Hunted by regime, Tripoli activist kept flame of protest burning
For six months, he ran a clandestine protest movement under the noses of the Gaddafi regime in its supposed stronghold of Tripoli.
Gadhafi loyalists blamed for Tripoli water crisis
Attacks by Moammar Gadhafi's forces on engineers deep in the Libyan desert caused the massive water shortage that has left the capital without running water for a week, a rebel official said Tuesday.
Burned Gadhafi family nanny being treated in Tripoli
The badly burned former nanny of two of Moammar Gadhafi's grandchildren was receiving medical treatment Tuesday in the burn unit of a Tripoli hospital.
Gaddafi's son abandons his lions in flight from Tripoli
Saadi Gaddafi and his bodyguards visited his nine lions in Tripoli's zoo every day until rebels overran the city
UN sanctions committee agrees to release $1.55 billion in Libyan bank notes
The UN sanctions committee has agreed to Britain's request to release $1.55bn of Libyan bank notes blocked in Britain as part of a freeze of assets held by the former government of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, Britain said on Tuesday.
Gadhafi supporters pledge allegiance to old regime in parts of Libya, even rebel-held town
Moammar Gadhafi's green flags still fly proudly above the main street in this bastion of support for his crumbling regime. Many here still openly pledge allegiance to the longtime Libyan leader.
Cyberwar: Gaddafi's online mercenary army
What I fail to understand is how people who have never lived under Gaddafi's dictatorship support his regime from abroad. It seems as soon as any politician waves the socialist flag, it means any human rights violation, act of corruption, suppression of democracy and freedom of speech are ignored by the youth in favour of a populist, propagandist campaign.


Day 195 August 31

Rebel military leader of Tripoli says al Saddi has called him and asked if he can surrender.
The rebel military leader of Tripoli, Abdelhakim Belhaj, has said that one of Gaddafi's son al Saddi called him two hours ago and asked if he can surrender.
Libya: Col Gaddafi's family dash across desert to Algeria
Last Friday, more than three days after the fall of Col Muammar Gaddafi's Bab al-Azizia compound, the soldiers of the Khamis Brigade in southern Tripoli were told to stand by for an important visitor.
Libya's new rulers set out steps to elections
Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) has set out steps leading to democratic elections monitored by the United Nations within 18 months.
Gaddafi's secret underground TV station - video
Alex Thomson burrows down into the tunnels beneath the Tripoli compound of Colonel Gaddafi in Libya - and finds "a world of total wackiness."
Flying the flag for North Africa's 'Berber spring'
While there has been much talk of the Arab spring, ethnic Berbers have played a key role in the changes sweeping through North Africa, which is leading to greater recognition for their culture and language.
Libya: 'Mass killing' sites in Tripoli (site map at link)
Evidence emerging from Libya suggests that several mass killings were carried out as rebel forces swept into the capital Tripoli earlier this month.
'A serious problem': friendly fire kills fellow Libyan rejoicers in celebrations
An 11-year-old boy has been killed by celebratory gunfire in Tripoli. His death is one of several "post-revolution friendly fire" casualties that is causing concern among the new government about the number of weapons in the city.
Juan Cole: What the UN Can and Cannot do for Libya
The new Libyan government has consistently rejected the idea of NATO troops, showing great wisdom. Yesterday the Voice of Free Libya in Benghazi said that "the rebels are capable of preserving the security of his country and don't need any foreign, Arab or Islamic forces to help preserving security in Libya." (h/t Open Source Center). I hope they are right about that, and note with encouragement that the broadcast put all kinds of foreign troops in the same category of undesirable, including those of Arab and Muslim nations, not just the Europeans. (That is not the way a Muslim fundamentalist would talk, and underlines how unimportant Muslim radicalism is in the Libyan revolution).
Storming Tripoli
Six months ago Mehdi al-Harati, an Arabic teacher, said goodbye to his wife and four children in Dublin and went off to war. Last week I was alongside him and his men ? many of them from Britain ? as they prepared to storm the Bastille of the Libyan revolution.
Former Qaddafi Mercenaries Describe Fighting in Libyan War
Last month at a guesthouse within sight of the rolling dunes of the open Sahara, I sat down to await one of Muammar Qaddafi's mercenaries. Through an intermediary he agreed to meet and explain why the Tuareg -- an ancient Saharan people who inhabit large desert swathes of Libya, Mali, Niger, and Algeria -- would help the Libyan leader crush the democracy protests -- including unarmed civilians, women, and children -- and eventually join in all-out war against the ensuing rebellion.
Qaddafi's African Adventure
From his 33 page 'book' that even today, he hands out wherever he goes, it's easy to see that Mummar Qaddafi promotes a lot of the standard racist mythology that black people are lazy and promiscuous. He also uses the spectra of increasing hordes of blacks looking for vengeance to create a climate of fear, another standard racist ploy. As we will see, racism and the creation of discord between Africans and Arabs has been one of the keys to his 42 year rule. Another is his cynical and self-serving manipulation of contradictions among the people in sub-Saharan Africa.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Note, this week is an animated gif, to show gains made by the freedom fighters.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 73 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (112 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Tue Aug 30th 2011, 07:23 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 28 part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A Libyan fighter celebrates on the roof of the Khamis 32 military encampment in southern Tripoli.

Photo: Reuters


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 193 August 29

Libya rebels on outskirts of Gathafi's last bastion
Libyan rebels backed by NATO were on the outskirts of Moamer Gathafi's hometown of Sirte on Monday as they closed in from east and west for the final big battle for full control of Libya.
Gaddafi's girl executioner: Nisreen, 19, admits shooting 11 rebel prisoners
First you see her large brown eyes and rosebud lips, framed by a pink headscarf. Then you notice that her bruised feet are secured by manacles to the foot of her bed.
Gaddafi: a vicious, sinister despot driven out on tidal wave of hatred
Despite his absurd, buffoonish persona, the Libya leader clung to power for four brutal decades
Libyan rebels free 10,000 from Gadhafi prisons
A rebel military spokesman says rebels have freed more than 10,000 from Moammar Gadhafi's prisons since entering Tripoli last week.
Unit led by Gaddafi's son carried out Tripoli massacre
A military unit commanded by one of Muammar Gaddafi's sons appears to have been responsible for the summary execution of dozens of detainees in a warehouse near Tripoli last week, a human rights organisation said on Monday.
Libyan Rebels Use Upper Hand Over Gadhafi Loyalists
In Libya, the tide has turned against Moammar Gadhafi and his supporters. And that has left an uncomfortable question for the new rebel authority: What to do with his loyalists and supporters?
On Patrol with the Benghazi Brigade: Winning Hearts and Minds in Tripoli
Under the scorching sun, Masoud Bwisir, 38, and his fellow rebels had just taken control of a checkpoint on Friday in the village of Tajura, 6 miles (10 km) east of the Libyan capital of Tripoli. All night, local youths manned the barricade ? composed of nothing more than a few concrete blocks and some metal railing ? but they wanted someone to take over, so they could pray in an adjacent mosque. And so Bwisir and his crew, still relatively fresh off a tugboat from Benghazi, relieved them of their duty.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Note, this week is an animated gif, to show gains made by the freedom fighters.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 52 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon, Tunisia, New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV ˜ 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 ˜ 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. ˜ 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (125 comments)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Mon Aug 29th 2011, 02:22 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 27 part 7 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A Libyan fighter celebrates on the roof of the Khamis 32 military encampment in southern Tripoli.

Photo: Reuters


Here's a link for Sky News, click the link to watch live footage.

Day 190 August 26

Libyan comedian says harder to joke without Gaddafi
For 35 years Milood Amroni, Libya's top comedian, used humor as a weapon to poke fun, ever so carefully, at the government of Muammar Gaddafi.
A citizen journalist in Tripoli: 'I've waited my entire life for this moment'
As soon as Tripoli fell into the hands of anti-Gaddafi fighters, one of our Observers took out his camera to film his neighbours' reactions.
New CNN Poll: Support for Libya jumps but no bounce for president
Support for U.S. military action in Libya has skyrocketed nearly 20 points in the wake of this week's events in Tripoli
Libya: Detainees killed by al-Gaddafi loyalists
Amnesty International has uncovered evidence that forces loyal to Colonel Muammar al-Gaddafi have killed numerous detainees being held at two military camps in Tripoli on 23 and 24 August.


Day 191 August 27

Gaddafi has crossed the line between murderous tyrant and plonker
All dictators know that the biggest threat to their power is ridicule. And now the people of Libya are laughing
Henchmen had secret plans to make Gadhafi 'King of Libya'
Colonel Moammar Gadhafi's regime was planning to proclaim him King of Libya once its forces had gained the upper hand over the rebels, documents show.
Libya: the luxury playboy homes of Colonel Gaddafi's henchmen
LIBYAN rebels lark about with guns in a playboy-style resort used by Gaddafi's sons and advisers.
Zimbabwe: Mugabe throws out defected Libyan envoy
Zimbabwe has Saturday told the Libyan ambassador and his embassy staff in Harare to leave the country after they defected to the National Transition Council (NTC).
A double agent in Gadhafi camp
For more than five months in a city locked down by forces loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi, regime opponents in Tripoli's Fashloom neighborhood relied on a fellow resistance leader who told them with uncanny accuracy how to evade security sweeps and tipped them off to impending raids against them.
Gaddafi's African 'mercenaries' leaving Libya
African soldiers recruited by Libyan leader Col Muammar Gaddafi have begun streaming home.
Libyan boy starts his own news agency, elbowing past foreign correspondents
Since the uprising began in Libya six months ago, hundreds of foreign reporters have descended on the rebel capital in the east. In the midst of them, at nearly every press conference held by the opposition council, one can find Malik Mohamed, a slight 14-year-old who has started his own news agency.
How to Avoid Bush's Iraq Mistakes in Libya
The illegal American invasion of Iraq and subsequent occupation was so epochal a catastrophe that it spawned a negative phrase in Arabic, "to Iraqize" or 'arqana.' Tonight I heard an Alarabiya anchor ask a spokesman for the new government in Libya whether there as a danger of the country being Iraqized."


Day 192 August 28

Libya's Interim Leadership Releases Its Members' Names
The Transitional National Council, recognized by 57 nations as the legitimate interim government of Libya, released the names of all of its members on Saturday for the first time and promised to increase its roster rapidly to provide representation to newly liberated parts of the country.
Gaddafi's end... and Libya's new beginning
The scale of the astonishing victory, as the rebels swept in with such speed and force that they took most of the capital before Gaddafi could organise a defence, surprised the revolutionaries, even if the dictator still eludes them and his loyalists hold out in pockets of resistance.
Libyan forces killed detainees: rights group
Evidence indicates that loyalists of Moammar Gadhafi killed at least 17 detainees and arbitrarily executed dozens of civilians as rebels moved into Tripoli, a New York-based human rights group said Sunday.
Report: Gadhaffi allegedly raped and abused five female bodyguards
Women tell Benghazi-based psychologist Gadhafi and sons sexually abused them, then discarded them once they were 'bored'.
Libyan rebels free more than 10,000 prisoners
More than 10,000 prisoners held by the regime of Moamer Kadhafi have been released since the rebels captured Tripoli, but nearly 50,000 are still missing, a rebel military spokesman said Sunday.
African Union rattled by Colonel Gaddafi's collapse in Libya
"Failing to realise that Gaddafi's killings undermined his legitimacy and made him better suited for an international tribunal than for a negotiating table was a terrible mistake," Mr Habimana said.
Libya oil production to re-start in mid-September
Operations will start on September 15 and by the end of the month we will have the capability to export from Tobruk," Abdeljalil Mayuf, spokesman for AGOCO, told Reuters.
An honourable intervention. A hopeful future
It's a simple question. Is the glass of Libyan rebel victory half empty or half full? And the answer, of course, is equally simple. Perhaps this cup doesn't run over, but it is full enough for everyone involved ? except Colonel Gaddafi.
Liberals and conservatives both got Libya wrong; Obama got it right
As another Arab dictatorship crumbles into the sand, both liberals and sovereignty conservatives should rethink their critiques of President Obama's Libya policy.
Luxury, horror lurk in Gadhafi family compound
As we were about to leave, one of the staff told us there was a nanny who worked for Hannibal Gadhafi who might speak to us. He said she'd been burnt by Hannibal's wife, Aline.
Muammar Gaddafi's son Khamis reportedly visited prisoners hours before they were massacred
SURVIVORS of a massacre in which at least 55 Libyan prisoners were herded into a barn, machine-gunned and set alight by regime loyalists have described how one of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's sons visited the site last week, hours before the order was given to execute the men.
Why the fall of Tripoli will not be another Baghdad
For me at least, as a witness to the collapse of both the Iraqi and the Libyan dictatorships, the differences, for now, seem greater than the similarities. In Baghdad in 2003, it took less than 24 hours for the city to crumble into looting and anarchy, a state from which it never really recovered.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Note, this week is an animated gif, to show gains made by the freedom fighters.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 52 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon, Tunisia, New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV �˜ 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 �˜ 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. �˜ 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


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