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BlueMTexpat's Journal - Archives
Posted by BlueMTexpat in Editorials & Other Articles
Mon Jan 10th 2011, 12:42 PM
From The Guardian (UK, of course) ...

<snip>
But what happened in Tucson cannot be brushed aside as one of those things that could happen to anyone in public life anywhere. It happened to an articulate, moderate, pro-business, pro-gun, female Democrat in the United States at a time of deepening and increasingly obsessive partisan polarisation. The US already had a distinctive history of political violence in the modern era. The assassinations of the 1960s, the Oklahoma City bombing of 1995 and a series of attacks on abortion clinics have all been evidence of the readiness of a small but significant group of mainly male, mainly white, mainly rightwing, mainly religious conservative Americans to use lawless, lethal violence against real or imagined examples of political movements or institutions by which they deem themselves threatened. ...
<snip>
What is clear, though, is that every Republican and media loudmouth who has flirted with insurrectionary rhetoric – and a lot have – should examine their consciences. It is hard to disagree with Sheriff Clarence Dupnik in Tucson, who lamented after the shooting that "the anger, the hatred, the bigotry that goes on in this country is getting to be outrageous". In many countries, an event like this might shock the political class into collective determination to change the tone. It is a measure of how different American politics has now become that it is hard to expect any such thing.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/20...

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Posted by BlueMTexpat in Editorials & Other Articles
Wed Jan 05th 2011, 03:34 PM
Here's another one from Michael Tomasky of the Guardian (UK, of course) whose comments are generally right in-line with my own thoughts. He just expresses them better as he interprets the follies known as US politics to the world at large.

<snip>
I remember very well the last time the Republicans took over the House of Representatives, under Newt Gingrich 15 years ago. Gingrich was as outrageous and demagogic then as he is now—in 1991 he participated in the ghastly gay-baiting of the then-speaker, a Democrat, based on absolutely no evidence of any sort. But there was, all the same, something … I can't quite type "likeable", but original about him. He thought, as they say, outside the box. I'll never forget that in his maiden speech as speaker, after he accept the gavel from the very man he'd so cruelly slimed, he invoked Franklin Roosevelt. You could hear liberal Democrats in the chamber gasp. That took chutzpah. Yes, Gingrich kept it interesting.

About this bunch, there is nothing interesting. Most of them are as bland and odourless as they are mercilessly and unashamedly in the employ of corporate America. The ones who aren't that are so far to the right that even corporations, at least some of them, are suspect, insofar as they can be woven into the fabric of dark conspiracies about how the government and the banks and Hollywood are out to capture "your" freedom and make "you" submit to coastal, elitist norms.

Who are these people? Here's a small sampling.

Speaker John Boehner, one hears repeatedly, grew up the poor son of a publican and one of 12 children in the very conservative suburbs of Cincinnati, Ohio. One hears less often that his net worth now is between $2m and $7m.

<snip>
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/ci...

No wonder the world at large is truly beginning to doubt our sanity.
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Posted by BlueMTexpat in General Discussion
Tue Jan 04th 2011, 05:29 PM
From Michael Tomasky in The Guardian (UK, of course) on-line ...

<snip>
... Having taken control of the House of Representatives as of tomorrow, Republicans now have to govern. They have to do things like make a budget. And not just a fake budget, like in a campaign. A real budget, that adds up, more or less. They have to negotiate with a Senate still in Democratic hands over the final shape of appropriations to the various federal agencies. All that sounds suspiciously like hard work. And Washington Republicans, for all their thumpety-thump rhetoric about hard work and personal initiative and so on, are largely lazy and unserious people. They won't do the work, and in two years, it will show.

<snip>
... When I say lazy I don't mean that they fail to arise from bed. They manage that. I mean intellectually lazy. And yes, unserious. Let's look at the last three Republican presidents, going back to 1980. In that time Republicans have been screaming about the budget deficit. So what did they actually do to fix it? Ronald Reagan opened up a gaping hole, which was somewhat repaired from its worst point by the time he left office but was still far larger than that of Jimmy Carter, his predecessor. On the whole, Reagan lost America $81bn. Think that's a lot? George HW Bush cost the country $135bn. Think that's a lot? His son cost us – get ready – $632bn. Bill Clinton, meanwhile, made us $526bn.

<snip>

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/ci...

...
Hang tight, all! We do live in interesting times.



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