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Thats my opinion's Journal
Posted by Thats my opinion in Religion/Theology
Sun Aug 28th 2011, 05:08 PM
Every major religious perspective and a variety of non-religious philosophic traditions, have at their ethical centers something very similar to what Christians call “the golden rule.” “Do to others what you would have others do to you”
This maxim lies at the heart of Christian faith. Some other examples:
• Brahmanism –“Do naught unto others which would cause you pain if done to you.”
• Buddhism—“Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.”
• Confucianism—“Do not do to others what you do not want them to do to you.”
• Hinduism—“Do not do to others what would cause pain if done to you.”
• Islam—“None of you truly believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.”
• Judaism—“Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.”
• Sikhism—“No one is my enemy, none a stranger, and everyone is my friend.”
• Sufism—“The basis of Sufism is consideration of the hearts and feelings of others.”
• Plato—“May I do to others as I would that they should do to me,”
Kant—“Act as if the maxim of thy actions were to become by they will a universal law of nature.”

A similar list might be generated with other principle ethical imperatives which run throughout both religious and secular history: Peace, justice, the care of the left-out, hospitality to the stranger, universal respect, compassion for the poor, widows and orphans, violence used as a last resort, if at all—and more.

I would be interesting in hearing of similar examples from other non-religious traditions.
Ayn Rand’s “Objectivism” is probably at the opposite ethical extreme.
If we are to take values seriously, we must struggle with the question of what makes for human good, in both personal and societal manifestations. Somehow our noblest political motivations ought at least to be in touch with these ethical presuppositions.
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