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joshcryer's Journal
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sun Oct 23rd 2011, 01:03 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Wrapup part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya are no longer relevant, because Gaddafi no longer controls Libya. This is what the Libyan freedom fighters were fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Libya has much much more work to do, but the people of Libya are now free of their tyrant, like Tunisia before them, and Egypt, Libya has now the opportunity to create a new state that is respectful of all Libyans. It will be a tough road ahead because of the various cultural issues that Gaddafi enforced throughout his 42 year reign, but that road cannot be as bad as the last 8 months of nightmarish hell they have had to endure at the hands of Gaddafi. I'll post a few more threads then we'll quietly retire these threads.



The death of Gaddafi means the end of war in Libya.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


The B-Boys, a group of Libyan breakdancers, practice outside a run-down government building in the capital Tripoli on October 22, 2011

Photo: Getty images


Women gathered at Liberation Square to celebrate the death of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi.

Photo: Reuters


A girl flashes a victory sign as people stand in line to see the body of former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in Misrata October 21, 2011

Photo: Reuters


Latest updates
Day 1 October 21

Why Libya has a real shot at democracy and stability
Libyans poured into the streets Thursday to celebrate the death of Moammar Gadhafi. After months of intense fighting, rebel fighters finally overran Gadhafi's last stronghold in his hometown of Sirte, marking the end of his 42-year rule.
Juan Cole: Qaddafi’s People’s Temple
The final weeks of Muammar Qaddafi’s violent and coercive life reminded me vividly of Jim Jones and the People’s Temple Cult. It was obvious from late last August that Qaddafi had lost. The people in his own capital of Tripoli rose up against him in all but a few small neighborhoods, courageously defying his murderous elite forces.
Gadhafi era ends: What's next for Libya?
His 42 years of despotic rule already at an end, deposed Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi ran out of places to hide Thursday and was killed after being cornered by rebels in his hometown stronghold of Sirte.
Qaddafi's death proves that Obama was right
The death of Qaddafi isn't just a victory for Libya. It validates Obama's and NATO's intervention – as opposed to the bitter ventures in Iraq and Afghanistan. The international community must now continue to support Libya as it builds an inclusive democracy and rebuilds its economy.
Gaddafi's death: 100 front pages
A slideshow of the front pages of 100 different newspapers and their report on Gaddafi's death.
NATO plans to end Libya mission October 31
NATO plans to end its seven-month air and sea mission in Libya on October 31 but will issue a formal decision next week after consulting the United Nations and Libya's interim authorities, NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen said Friday.


Day 2 October 22

U.N. calls for Gadhafi death investigation
The United Nations and two major human rights groups called Friday for an investigation into the death of Moammar Gadhafi amid questions over the final moments of the late Libyan strongman's life.
As Libya takes stock, Moammar Kadafi's hidden riches astound
New estimates of the former leader's assets — more than $200 billion — are called 'staggering.' If they prove true, he would rank among the world's most rapacious leaders.
Gaddafi family demands body; NATO ends Libya war
NATO called an end to its air war in Libya, and the clan of Muammar Gaddafi demanded a chance to bury the body that lay on display in a meat locker after a death as brutal and chaotic as his 42-year rule.
In Libya, a spectacle greets Moammar Kadafi's corpse
As Libyans line up to view Kadafi's body in Misurata, they ridicule, reflect and look ahead. Meanwhile, the U.N. calls for an investigation into the former leader's mysterious death.
Clues to Gaddafi's death concealed from public view
Libyan forces guarding Muammar Gaddafi's body in a cold storage room on Saturday let in members of the public to view the deposed leader for a second day, but the wounds that may hold the clue to how he died were covered up.
Libyan PM vows election within '8 months, maximum'
Libyans should be allowed to vote within eight months to elect a national council that would draft a new constitution and form an interim government, Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril said Saturday.
Son tried to broker deal to save Gaddafi 10 days before he was killed
Meanwhile, Sky sources have revealed that one of Col Gaddafi's sons - Saadi - tried to broker a deal to save him 10 days before he was captured and killed. He is said to have phoned the most senior military leader in Tripoli, but his plea was rebuffed.
Gaddafi's body is latest war trophy for Misrata
Gaddafi's body has become a grisly attraction for the city's residents as it awaits burial. Two other "trophies," among the fallen leader's most eye-catching possessions, were also driven to Misrata after its fighters overran his Tripoli compound.
Gaddafi's Body To Go To His Extended Family
Colonel Gaddafi's dead body is to be handed to his extended family in a deal reached with Libya's interim government, Sky News has learned.


Day 3 October 23

Welcome back to Benghazi! - video
Fighters return to Benghazi after the end of the 8 month conflict.
Libyan PM says wishes Gaddafi had not been killed
Libya's Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril said in an interview with the BBC on Saturday he wished former dictator Muammar Gaddafi had not been killed and instead had been put on trial for his crimes.
Rebels: Gadhafi's son Saif al-Islam captured alive
Slain dictator Moammar Gadhafi's influential son and heir-apparent, Saif al-Islam, has been captured alive and uninjured, rebel sources told NBC News on Saturday.
Canada’s role in Gadhafi’s fall
“Back in the mid 1990s we adopted human security as the basis of our foreign policy,” says then foreign minister Lloyd Axworthy, now president of the University of Winnipeg. “We were elected to the UN Security Council on a platform of protection for civilians.”



Libya is Free


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 100 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30), Pakistan (October 12), Bangladesh (October 13).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (234 comments) | Recommend (+5 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Fri Oct 21st 2011, 07:57 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 35 part 4 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya are no longer relevant, because Gaddafi no longer controls Libya. This is what the Libyan freedom fighters were fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Libya has much much more work to do, but the people of Libya are now free of their tyrant, like Tunisia before them, and Egypt, Libya has now the opportunity to create a new state that is respectful of all Libyans. It will be a tough road ahead because of the various cultural issues that Gaddafi enforced throughout his 42 year reign, but that road cannot be as bad as the last 8 months of nightmarish hell they have had to endure at the hands of Gaddafi. I'll post a few more threads (maybe 2 or three tops) then we'll quietly retire these threads. I know DU has tired of this over the past year, but I had to do it for Mo. Sitting on my chair, being some sort of lame armchair observer of a situation, I couldn't just sit back and let the bad things happening in Libya go unnotice, ignored, and outright misdirected. For the last 8 months the one pressing, unwaivering goal of these threads was to provide the most unbiased report of the revolution you could find, so that people could see that the Libyan people were good people who only wanted to rid themselves of a tyrant.

I think we succeeded at that, even if the "other side" was 'louder.'

The fall of Gaddafi means the end of war in Libya.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libyans celebrated at Martyrs’ Square in Tripoli on Thursday after Colonel Qaddafi was killed in Surt

Photo: Ismail Zitouni/Reuters


Libyans rejoiced as news of his death spread. Car horns blared in Tripoli and in the eastern city of Benghazi, where the rebellion against Colonel Qaddafi began in February.

Photo: Ismail Zitouni/Reuters


Latest updates
Day 1 October 21

Gadhafi’s death stirs little remorse across Africa
But there was only silence from most African governments after his death. The eccentric Libyan tyrant had long since worn out his African welcome, and he will not be mourned.
Robert Fisk: You can't blame Gaddafi for thinking he was one of the good guys
We loved him. We hated him. Then we loved him again. Blair slobbered over him. Then we hated him again. Then La Clinton slobbered over her BlackBerry and we really hated him even more again.
An open door in Libya
The death of Moammar Gadhafi marks a major moment for Libya - and for NATO. It opens a new phase in the country's struggle for independence, one that carries with it some real risks that Libya's new leadership will need to work hard to overcome in coming weeks.
China urges inclusive political process in Libya
China said Friday that Moammar Gadhafi's death marks the turning of a page in Libya's history and called for the rapid launch of an inclusive political process and economic reconstruction.
Al-Jazeera: NTC fighters talk about the last battle - video
Al Jazeera speaks to some of the Libyan fighters as they recount how they fought, captured Muammar Gaddafi and how he was eventually killed after a clash broke out.
Analysis: Libya's next tests - Big expectations, power plays
Jockeying for power among Libya's well-armed and fractious new leadership may intensify after the death of Muammar Gaddafi, an anxious and, for many, joyous moment in a country hungry for stability and impatient to swap the bullet for the ballot box.
Gadhafi's burial delayed for further investigation
A Libyan official says the burial of slain leader Moammar Gadhafi has been delayed until his death can be examined by the International Criminal Court.
Gaddafi son Saif fleeing towards Niger - NTC officer
Muammar Gaddafi's son Saif al-Islam is fleeing south from Sirte towards Libya's border with Niger, a senior military commander of the interim National Transitional Council (NTC) said on Friday.
NTC to announce 'national liberation' on Saturday
Al-Jazeera's James Bays reports that the NTC says it will announce "national liberation" on Saturday. He says the announcement will be made from Benghazi, the base for the NTC throughout the civil war. The council had said that they would declare the liberation of Libya after Sirte fell.



Libya is Free


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 100 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30), Pakistan (October 12), Bangladesh (October 13).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (202 comments) | Recommend (+21 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Thu Oct 20th 2011, 08:20 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 35 part 3 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Freedom fighters celebrate the fall of Sirte and death of Gaddafi.

Photo: AJE



Day 245 October 20

Gaddafi killed as Libya's revolt claims hometown
Former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi died of wounds suffered on Thursday as fighters battling to complete an eight-month-old uprising against his rule overran his hometown Sirte, Libya's interim rulers said.



Libya is Free


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 100 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30), Pakistan (October 12), Bangladesh (October 13).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (134 comments) | Recommend (+11 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Wed Oct 19th 2011, 07:45 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 35 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Freedom fighters rest in front of a door that says "Libya Today, Tomorrow Wall Street," in solidarity with OWS.

Photo: Twitter


Day 243 October 18

UNICEF: Communities band together to reopen schools damaged in the Libyan conflict
Burnt out tanks, armoured cars and spent ammunition shells line the road between Benghazi and Ajdabiya, an apocalyptic landscape left by the vicious battles that took place here only weeks ago. After residents of Ajdabiya fled the conflict, the military occupied the town’s abandoned schools, which in turn, made them prime targets for attack.
Hungary Seeks Seat Among UN Powerful for Unsung Role in Libya
In Libya, as a revolt against Muammar Qaddafi’s four-decade regime turned dangerous, Hungarian diplomats did what most others didn’t do: They stuck around.
Libyans push into Gadhafi's hometown from east
About 1,000 Libyan revolutionary troops have launched a major assault on Moammar Gadhafi's hometown, surging from the east to try to capture the last area under loyalist control.
Fierce battle in Sirte leaves at least 23 NTC fighters wounded in first 15 minutes
Fierce street fighting has erupted between Libyan fighters and Muammar Gaddafi's remaining loyalists in Sirte, the deposed Libyan leader's last bastion, an AFP correspondent said.
Clinton in Libya to offer new aid package
The Obama administration on Tuesday increased U.S. support for Libya's new leaders as Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton made an unannounced visit to Tripoli and pledged millions of dollars in new aid, including medical care for wounded fighters and additional assistance to secure weaponry that many fear could fall into the hands of terrorists.
Front-line stories from the Arab Spring
Both women, former frontline correspondents who informed the world about the recent political upheavals in the Arab world, recount their experiences to a gathering of World Editors Forum guests Saturday morning.
Democracy Now! The New Libya: Exclusive Video on Challenges Facing a Nation Emerging from Gaddafi’s 42-Year Rule
After 42 years under Gaddafi’s rule, Libyans long repressed under his regime are publicly speaking out.
In Libyan Rebel Capital, Shouts of Thanks to America and the West
Americans and, for that matter, all Westerners are treated hereabouts with a warmth and gratitude rarely seen in any Muslim country — even those with 100,000 American troops — in probably half a century or more.
At Bani Walid party, Libya fighters look to future
"We never had anything but we were never afraid of Gaddafi. This generation had no fear," 26-year-old Abdul shouted to Reuters over the noise of the celebrations.
Libyans close to total victory over Gadhafi forces
Revolutionary forces celebrated the capture of one Moammar Gadhafi stronghold and closed in Tuesday on the last holdouts in the fugitive leader's hometown of Sirte, putting total victory in their eight-month uprising just a few city blocks away.


Day 243 October 19

Voice of Sydney Islamic moderation silenced in Libya
"He will be seen by all Libyans as a national hero who risked his own personal safety," said his friend and founder of the Islamic Friendship Association of Australia Keysar Trad.
Heavy shelling from Gaddafi forces takes toll on NTC fighters in Sirte
At the eastern end of Sirte's seafront, a Reuters reporter saw the spot where, an hour earlier, mortars had landed in a cluster of NTC fighters. Thirteen of them were killed in the incident, witnesses said. Blood from one of the victims stained the steps of a nearby house.
Libyan rebels searching for weapons and loyalists in captured city
Libyan rebels finally in control of a key stronghold of Muammar Gaddafi’s supporters were digging in searches for hidden weapons yesterday, a concrete sign that the long battle for Bani Walid was virtually over.
NTC forces take control of Dollar neighborhood in Sirte; loyalists now #2 only
Muammar Gaddafi's remaining loyalist fighters have been pinned into a small section of the ousted leader's hometown Sirte after a fierce battle which saw heavy casualties, a commander said on Wednesday.
Bizarre bulldozer battleship roars into Libya fight
Onto a battlefield littered with bizarre homemade weaponry, Libya's ruling militia fighters have rolled out their weirdest contraption yet: a concrete and steel behemoth that's a cross between a bulldozer and a battleship.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 100 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30), Pakistan (October 12), Bangladesh (October 13).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (94 comments) | Recommend (0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Mon Oct 17th 2011, 09:51 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 35 part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) fighters escort civilians fleeing Sirte during heavy fighting on October 17, 2011.

Photo: Getty Images


Day 240 October 15

Survivor mourns dead piled up on Gaddafi son’s doorstep
Libyan fighters have discovered a mass grave of men thought to have been captives of troops loyal to Colonel Muammar al-Gaddafi in the former dictator’s crumbling stronghold of Sirte as fighting continued yesterday.
Libya owes $1 billion for fuel for revolution
Libya imported $1.6 billion worth of fuel during the six months of revolution, including from Qatar and Turkey, and has yet to repay $890 million, the interim oil and finance minister said on Thursday.
U.S. Sending More Contractors to Secure Libya's Weapons Stockpile
The State Department is sending dozens of American contractors to Libya to help that country's fledgling efforts to track down and destroy heat-seeking antiaircraft missiles looted from government stockpiles that could be used against civilian airliners.
Libyan government fighters advance on Bani Walid
Troops loyal to Libya's transitional government said on Saturday they were advancing on Bani Walid, a day after clashes with forces loyal to deposed leader Moamer Gaddafi left nine people killed in the area.
Libyan govt beefs up security after clashes in capital
Libya's new government beefed up security in Tripoli on Saturday with extra roadblocks and house-to-house searches after fighting in the capital with supporters of Muammar Gaddafi raised fears of an insurgency.
Gadhafi expected to be found guilty in Sadr case
The Judicial Council is expected to issue a guilty verdict and death sentence in absentia next month against ousted Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi in the 33-year-old disappearance of Shiite cleric Imam Musa Sadr and two of his companions.
NTC commanders holding off on all-out assault in Sirte today
"We want to capture them alive to hand them over to the judiciary rather than killing them, which is why we are still not going to have a massive attack."
Kadhafi fighters mount fierce fightback in Sirte
As Grad and other rockets, shells and machinegun fire rained down on them, NTC combatants, taken by surprise, quickly fled the positions on the edge of the two neighbourhoods that they had held since Friday night.
Ruined Sirte becomes a killing ground as Gaddafi loyalists face destruction, but mete out death
It was envisaged by Colonel Muammar Gaddafi as a model of what a modern African city should be: a brilliant panoply of university and hospitals, with a glittering seafront and a marble-lined conference centre to host leaders from around the world. But this weekend the centre of Sirte, the birthplace of the former Libyan leader and lavished with money and attention for that reason, is a squalid ruin in which a pocket of diehard Gaddafi loyalists - outnumbered and outgunned - are slogging it out in a desperate, destructive attempt to delay their inevitable defeat.
UNICEF Situation Report # 27 - Libya Crisis Date: 13 October 201
UNICEF is supporting Save the Children who is currently operating 13 Child Friendly Spaces in Benghazi, 9 in schools and 4 in IDP sites or host communities. Identification and training for another 10 child friendly spaces (CFS) in Ajdabiya has been completed, and these sites will open in the coming week. An additional CFS was opened in the newly established site for IDPs from Tawarga, with UNICEF supplies including a tent, ECD and school in a box supplies.
Israeli man trying to preserve the history of Jews in Libya
An Israeli man, descended from Libyan Jews, is trying to preserve the vanishing history of the Jewish people of Libya.
Striking Workers Force Decision on Oil Field Management
Under the regime of Muammar Al Qathafi, workers' rights were unheard of; worker' strikes were illegal and independent workers' unions outlawed. Now for the first time in 42 years, workers managed to test the strength in unity. Unions are free to organise and workers free to strike.


Day 241 October 16

Anti-Gaddafi forces claim headway into Bani Walid, delay Sirte push
Forces loyal to Libya's new rulers claimed Sunday major advances on the town of Bani Walid, one of the last bastions of the fugitive deposed leader Moamer Gaddafi.
Libya Fighters Search Capital for Opponents After Firefight With Loyalists
Libyan fighters searched neighborhoods in Tripoli for armed supporters of Muammar Qaddafi, after a firefight broke out between his loyalists and opponents in the capital.
Libyans Tearing Down Gadhafi's Tripoli Compound
Libyan bulldozers began knocking down the green walls surrounding Moammar Gadhafi's main Tripoli compound known as Bab al-Aziziya on Sunday, as the new leaders said it was time "to tear down this symbol of tyranny."
NTC forces advance in Bani Walid and Sirte
Libyan NTC fighters have taken control of Bani Walid hospital after fierce fighting with Gaddafi troops.
In Gaddafi's hometown, residents accuse NTC fighters of revenge
Residents returning to Sirte are accusing Libyan interim government fighters of demolishing and looting homes, shops and public buildings in Muammar Gaddafi's home town to take revenge for its support of the fugitive leader.


Day 242 October 17

Libya survivor sheds light on piles of bodies around Surt
The fighters say all were executed by loyalist forces in a paroxysm of revenge and fury as former rebels advanced into the crumbling Kadafi stronghold of Surt.
My Walk Through the Valley of Death
When Janine di Giovanni arrived in Libya, she hoped to find a triumphant nation basking in newfound freedom. Instead she was confronted with a land haunted by the ghosts of Gaddafi's reign of terror.
Libya bulldozes Gaddafi's Tripoli compound
Libyan revolutionary forces bulldozed the green walls surrounding Muammar Gaddafi's main Tripoli compound, saying it was time "to tear down this symbol of tyranny".
Libyan interim fighters 'enter Bani Walid'
NTC military commanders say they met heavy resistance from Gaddafi loyalists in the town, 170km southeast of Tripoli.
Libya forces battle Kadhafi diehards for Bani Walid
The focus of the NTC operations (in Sirte) are two seaside residential neighbourhoods, the Dollar and Number Two, where Kadhafi loyalists are holed up.
Egyptians freed from Sirte clamor to go home
'We were trapped. We had no car to use to escape and we were afraid of the Qadhafi snipers. We could hear the bullets flying outside. The walls were shaking, all the windows exploded during the fight,' he recalled.
Relatives of Gaddafi officials flee Sirte
Families of former Libyan regime officials have streamed out of Sirte, including the mother and brother of Muammar Gaddafi's spokesman Mussa Ibrahim, an NTC field commander says.
Boxing-Libya's outlawed boxers open first club in 30 years
When Muhammad Ali was photographed shaking hands with Libya's most promising boxer, few could have known Giubran Zugdani would soon never been seen in the ring again.
Gaddafi stronghold Bani Walid falls
A breakthrough in the siege of the town came over the weekend when senior members of the resident Warfilla tribe, which accounts for roughly 15% of Libya's total population, said they would recognise the NTC as long as its forces did not invade.
NTC forces celebrate capture of Gaddafi bastion Bani Walid
Fighters with Libya's interim government fired their guns into the air and hoisted the country's new flag over the centre of Bani Walid on Monday to celebrate their capture of one of the final bastions of Muammar Gaddafi's loyalists.
NTC confirms agreement with NATO that partially lifts No Fly Zone
In a step toward normalcy, the transitional leadership council confirmed it has signed an agreement with NATO that partially lifts the no-fly zone imposed in March over the country, allowing resumption of some flights without seeking NATO approval. The embargo was imposed as part of the U.N. Security Council resolution that authorized airstrikes to protect civilians from Gadhafi's regime.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 99 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30), Pakistan (October 12), Bangladesh (October 13).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (113 comments) | Recommend (0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Wed Oct 12th 2011, 08:49 PM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 34 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


In this handout photo privided by UNHCR, actress and UN Goodwill Ambassador Angelina Jolie visits Libya to help agencies bringing aid to Libyans in Tripoli and Misrata on October 11, 2011 in Misrata, Libya.

Photo: J Tanner, UNHCR


Day 235 October 10

Libya fighters in 'final stages' to take Gadhafi hometown, they say
Fighters loyal to Libya's new leaders say they have "reached the final stages of the fight" to take control of former leader Moammar Gadhafi's hometown.
Libya govt forces attack Gaddafi security HQ in Sirte
Libyan transitional government forces attacked deposed leader Muammar Gaddafi's security headquarters in the centre of his hometown of Sirte, hoping that once the buildings had been captured the fight for the city would be won.
Libyan Islamist demands role for "moderate" Islam
"We call for a moderate Islam," Ali Al-Sallabi said at a meeting late on Sunday that included supporters and opponents. "But you all have to understand that Islam is not just about punishment, cutting hands and beheading with swords."
Libya battalions unite in Sirte
Each night near the embattled city of Sirte, battalion leaders meet in an abandoned beach palace. Here, in this elaborate former retreat of a Gaddafi spokesman, they discuss the next day’s battle tactics.
Libya fighters find scenes of despair in Surt hospital
Reporting from Surt, Libya— An emaciated patient lay unconscious in the abandoned intensive care unit. The heart monitor beside the bed beeped loudly, ringing out across an empty ward damaged by a bomb blast. Outside the battle continued to rage.
Libyan Forces Seize Key Locations in Sirte
Libyan forces from Misrata said they wrested control of key buildings in Muammar Qaddafi’s hometown of Sirte from his supporters, after several days of intense street fighting that left scores dead and wounded.
Libyan fighters seize Gaddafi's luxury cars in Sirte - video
NTC fighters claim they found the white two-seat open top vehicles during the push into Col Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte.
Anti-Gadhafi fighters celebrate gains in Libya
Jubilant revolutionary forces raised their tricolor flag Monday over a convention center in Sirte that served as a base for Moammar Gadhafi's loyalists there, but fighting surged elsewhere in the fugitive leader's hometown.
Peter Beaumont from Sirte, near the TV station - audio
The Guardian's Peter Beaumont in #Sirte amidst the battle for control of the TV station
'Dogfight' For Heart Of Gaddafi Stronghold
Libya's interim government forces are preparing to push into the heart of Colonel Gaddafi's home town where 1,000 loyalists may be holed up.
Libya's Transitional Government Faces Human Rights Challenges
Libya's new leaders are forming a transitional government as they consolidate control and battle the remaining forces loyal to deposed leader Moammar Gadhafi. They face numerous challenges - perhaps one of the greatest being in the area of human rights.
Militia hands over Tripoli airport to government
Libya's interim government took over the country's main international airport from a group of regional fighters on Monday as part of its efforts to consolidate control over strategic infrastructure.


Day 236 October 11

Mountainous terrain hampering Gaddafi hunt: NTC
Fugitive Muammar Gaddafi may be hiding in a remote and thinly-populated area surrounded by mountains in an attempt to frustrate efforts to track him, a representative of Libya's ruling National Transitional Council (NTC) said on Monday.
Flushed with freedom, Libya university awaits student rebels
In the lobby of the University of Tripoli's engineering department, Abdo Raouf was painting a mural in honour of a "free Libya," nodding his head to the rhythm of hard rock music. "We can finally speak freely," said the 23-year-old geophysics major, who sported a bandana around his head. "We can finally be ourselves instead of being afraid."
Libya football team indebted to keeper Aboud
The national football team of the 'new' Libya was indebted to long-serving goalkeeper Samir Aboud as they defied the odds again at the weekend to reach the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations.
Despite heavy losses, NTC fighters determined to capture Bani Walid 'at any cost'
After what is being described as "a fierce battle", National Transitional Council fighters have advanced to the southern gate of Bani Walid, the stronghold of Muammar Gaddafi loyalists.
Libya experiencing first steps of reconciliation
Foreign Minister Tonio Borg said that signs of reconciliation are emerging in Libya as the country strives to move forward after 42 years of dictatorship.
Exclusive: Angelina Jolie visits Libya to show solidarity
Actress and U.N. goodwill ambassador Angelina Jolie was in Libya on Tuesday for a visit to help agencies bringing aid to Libyans in Tripoli and Misrata, she said in a statement provided to Reuters.
Anti-Kadhafi fighters seize Sirte police HQ
Fighters from Libya's new regime seized the police headquarters in the centre of Moamer Kadhafi's hometown Sirte on Tuesday as they moved in for the kill against the strongman's remaining diehards.
Head of Libya's NTC visits battle-torn Sirte
Abdel Jalil called on the NTC fighters not to harm residents of the city, even if they suspect they are loyal to Gaddafi.
Libya's main airport to reopen within month: NTC
Libya's main international airport will reopen within a month and several international carriers have agreed to start flights again, the interim transport minister said on Tuesday.
Libyan forces gain momentum in Sirte assault
Big advances in centre of city, as Nato official says continued resistance by pro-Gaddafi fighters is 'surprising'
Libya fighters 'punch through Sirte defences'
Al Jazeera's frontline correspondent says NTC fighters have made a major breakthrough in battle for Gaddafi's hometown.
A look inside the Djeida prison in Tripoli
A peek into the Djeida prison in Tripoli, Libya that currently houses about 1400 inmates, including Gadhafi loyalist fighters, criminals, former regime ministers and foreign immigrants.


Day 237 October 12

Libya says it will restart oil field within days
Production from a Libyan oil field will restart within days and the country should be able to pump 1 million barrels per day (bpd) within a year, the interim oil and finance minister said on Tuesday.
Al-Qaida chief urges Islamic rule in Libya
Al-Qaida's new leader is calling on Libyan fighters who overthrew Moammar Gadhafi to set up an Islamic state and urges Algerians to revolt against their longtime leader in remarks in a new Internet video.
Angelina Jolie praises Libya's revolutionaries
"I'm also here on behalf of the Libyan people to show them solidarity. I think this revolution on behalf of human rights, which is what I feel these people really have been doing and what they have pushed for, and to help them to implement these new laws and help them with the future of their country."
"It's nearly all over now," The Guardian's Peter Beaumont reports from Sirte
It is still noisy but there is very very little incoming fire. It looks as though, if not today then tomorrow, the battle for Sirte will be over and the government will declare the full liberation of Libya.
Gaddafi resistance crumbling in Libya's Sirte
Resistance from fighters loyal to ousted Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi crumbled in his home town overnight, government commanders said on Wednesday, and just two small pockets still held out.
Libya's NTC fighters find 25 corpses in Sirte
The corpses of 25 people wrapped in plastic sheets were found on Wednesday in the city of Sirte by government forces, who accused militias fighting for deposed leader Muammar Gaddafi of execution-style killings.
Libyan leader hopes to declare victory within week
Libya's de facto leader said Wednesday he expected to declare total victory over forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi in less than a week, as the International Committee of the Red Cross warned thousands of civilians were still trapped in the fugitive leader's besieged home city.
Libyan civilians attest to the positives and negatives of the NATO campaign - video
Libyan civilians attest to the positives and negatives of the NATO bombing campaign, which was carried out in their area due to Qadhafi military targets.
First ever Amazigh conference in Libya
Historic first ever Amazigh conference in the new Libya! Gaddafi banned the Amazigh language throughout his rule.
Swiss say trying to release dictators' stashed loot
Switzerland is trying to help the new authorities of Tunisia, Egypt and Libya recover 770 million Swiss francs ($850 million) in frozen assets linked to their ousted leaders, but the process could take years, a senior Swiss official said on Wednesday.
Libya fighters take last Sirte escape route
NTC fighters reach the coast and isolate remaining loyalists in two pockets of Muammar Gaddafi's hometown.
Libya: Gaddafi loyalists forced into tiny pocket in last stand
Gaddafi loyalists have been forced back into two small pockets of Sirte as revolutionary forces pounded the buildings where they were making a last desperate stand.
Gaddafi's son Mo'tassim caught in Sirte
"I can confirm there is an important figure who was arrested and is being transferred to Benghazi," Mohammed Bouker of the National Working Group, an NTC committee, told Reuters. "The name will be announced tomorrow for security reasons."



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 98 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (117 comments) | Recommend (<0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Mon Oct 10th 2011, 05:23 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 34 part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A Libyan revolutionary fighter removes a green flag from a house in Sirte, Libya.

Photo: AP


Day 233 October 8

Final battle for Gadhafi's hometown begins
Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) says it is closing in on victory over deposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi, as revolutionary fighters tighten the noose on the remaining regime loyalists in the critical bastion of Sirte.
Libya - Crowd Protests Libyan Jews Attempt To Restore Shul
A crowd of about 30 people picketed outside a hotel to protest an exiled Libyan Jewish man’s attempt to restore the capital’s main synagogue.
Libyan forces mount attack on southern Sirte
Transitional Libyan government forces with heavy guns mounted on some 100 vehicles swept into Sirte on Saturday in one of the biggest assaults yet in the battle for Muammar Gaddafi's hometown, but had to seek cover when they drew withering fire from his diehard loyalists.
Loyalists in Sirte fiercely defend 3 areas with tanks, heavy artillery and rockets
The government forces tell us they have held on to their gains from yesterday but they certainly pulled back a little bit overnight from positions where they thought they would be vulnerable to counter-attack, and they did indeed take quite a number of casualties.
Libyans Face Heavy Resistance in Gadhafi Hometown
With NATO warplanes circling overhead, revolutionary fighters battled block by block Saturday as snipers rained fire from rooftops in fierce street fighting in Moammar Gadhafi's hometown — the most important remaining bastion of support for the fugitive leader.
Libyan fighters push deep inside Sirte, battling against weakening loyalist troops
In ferocious close-contact, street-to-street fighting, they took a central residential complex about a mile and half (3km) inside the city.
Misrata: Libyan city takes siege mentality to national stage
Months of bombardment by Muammar Gaddafi's forces, and a central role in the war that ended his rule, have bound the devastated Libyan city of Misrata into an extended military family that runs on trust.
Libya fighters seize strategic highway in Sirte
Forces from Libya's interim regime scored a strategic goal on Saturday in their push to capture Sirte, seizing a highway that opens the way to a final assault on a key base of troops loyal to Moamer Kadhafi.
Snipers in last-ditch bid to defend Gaddafi hometown
For the anti-Gaddafi fighters down in Sirte's neat grid of streets, their offensive has turned into a deadly game of cat-and-mouse with snipers.
Libya: resistance weakens as troops advance into Gaddafi's hometown
Defenders firing few rockets and avoiding firefights may be running low on ammunition in Sirte
Deaths mount as anti-Kadhafi fighters inch forward
At least 17 people were killed and 300 wounded in two days of clashes as Libya's new regime fighters struggled to take full control of Moamer Kadhafi's hometown of Sirte, medics said on Saturday.
Pro-Gaddafi fighters filmed firing Scud missile in battle for Sirte
Amateur footage captured from a pro-Gaddafi fighter is purported to show a Scud missile being fired in Sirte as the bloody battle for the loyalist stronghold reaches a crescendo.
Soccer-Libya celebrate probable Nations Cup berth
Libya tearfully celebrated probable qualification for next year's African Nations Cup finals after a heroic defensive display forced a 0-0 draw in Zambia on Saturday. ... "This is for all Libyans, for our revolution," said (Goalkeeper Samir Aboud, 39), whose agile saves made him look like a 21-year-old.


Day 234 October 9

Darkened screens at Benghazi multiplex await war's end
The day after the Libyan revolution erupted in February, Benghazi's posh Al-Feel multiplex cinema closed its doors. Its screens are likely to remain dark until the war ends and the boys come home.
Sky Trio Win War Awards For Libya Reports
Three journalists from Sky News have been given prestigious reporting awards at the annual Bayeux-Calvados ceremony for war correspondents.
Libya govt says captures Sirte landmark targets
Libyan transitional government forces said on Sunday they had captured the university and a conference centre in Muammar Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte, but were holding off an assault on the main square to let civilians escape.
Libya govt forces seize main hospital in Sirte
Libyan transitional government forces seized the main hospital in the city of Sirte on Sunday, a Reuters witness said, capturing more than a dozen fighters loyal to former leader Muammar Gaddafi who had used the buildings to launch mortars and rocket-propelled grenades.
U.S. firms face mixed fate in Libya as workers strike
Workers protesting at the headquarters of Libya's National Oil Company on Sunday said they would strike until managers were replaced and possibly tried for fighting alongside Gaddafi.
Libya liberators battle into centre of Sirte
Troops loyal to Libya’s new leaders battled deep into Muammer Gaddafi’s home town on Sunday, moving close to a symbolic triumph that will start the clock ticking towards the country’s first free elections for more than 40 years.
Libya conflict: Gaddafi town Sirte 'close to falling' - BBC
Interim government forces in Libya have made significant gains in the battle for the city of Sirte - hometown of the fugitive leader Col Muammar Gaddafi.


Day 235 October 10

Libya fighters in 'final stages' to take Gadhafi hometown, they say
Fighters loyal to Libya's new leaders say they have "reached the final stages of the fight" to take control of former leader Moammar Gadhafi's hometown.
Libya govt forces attack Gaddafi security HQ in Sirte
Libyan transitional government forces attacked deposed leader Muammar Gaddafi's security headquarters in the centre of his hometown of Sirte, hoping that once the buildings had been captured the fight for the city would be won.
Libyan Islamist demands role for "moderate" Islam
"We call for a moderate Islam," Ali Al-Sallabi said at a meeting late on Sunday that included supporters and opponents. "But you all have to understand that Islam is not just about punishment, cutting hands and beheading with swords."
Libya battalions unite in Sirte
Each night near the embattled city of Sirte, battalion leaders meet in an abandoned beach palace. Here, in this elaborate former retreat of a Gaddafi spokesman, they discuss the next day’s battle tactics.
Libya fighters find scenes of despair in Surt hospital
Reporting from Surt, Libya— An emaciated patient lay unconscious in the abandoned intensive care unit. The heart monitor beside the bed beeped loudly, ringing out across an empty ward damaged by a bomb blast. Outside the battle continued to rage.
Libyan Forces Seize Key Locations in Sirte
Libyan forces from Misrata said they wrested control of key buildings in Muammar Qaddafi’s hometown of Sirte from his supporters, after several days of intense street fighting that left scores dead and wounded.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 98 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (134 comments) | Recommend (0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sat Oct 08th 2011, 04:36 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 33 part 3 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Anti-Qaddafi fighters joined the celebration after a graduation ceremony in Tripoli, Libya.

Photo: Suhaib Salem / Reuters



Day 230 October 5

Sean Penn visits ‘inspirational’ Libya
“This is my first visit to inspirational Libya. I am inspired by the Arab Spring and am here to be able to get a sense of what humanitarian aid can be delivered” to the people, Penn told AFP after landing at Benghazi airport.
Volunteers care for sick animals at Gaddafi's menagerie
Flopped in the baking sand, deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's ostrich thrashes wildly, then lays its beak in the dust to die.
Al Jazeera reports on 'final assault' on Sirte - video
In an exclusive interview with Al Jazeera, the commanders leading the battle for Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte, say they have begun a final assault to seize the town.
Libya NTC forces expect to take Sirte in 48 hours
"More than half of the city is under the control of the rebels," said the commander, Adel Al-Hasi. "In two days, God willing, Sirte will be free."
Al Arabiya reports heavy clashes in the center of Sirte
Heavy clashes between Libyan revolutionary fighters and pro-Qaddafi forces in the center of the city of Sirte
On the run, Gaddafi leaves few footprints
Dressed in rags and holding a cellphone, Muammar Gaddafi sits in the shade of an oasis palm in the southern Libyan desert. He gazes wistfully at signs that say "Niger 450 km", "Burkina Faso 2,700 km", "Algiers, 650 km". The cartoon, displayed on an easel in the lobby of Tripoli's Mahari hotel, raises a smile from patrons checking their AK-47 assault rifles and machine pistols in the wooden gun rack behind the security desk.
Gaddafi determined to avoid Saddam Hussein's fate
When Muammar Gaddafi ponders his future from his hideout somewhere in Libya, he will probably recall the fate of another fallen Arab autocrat, Saddam Hussein, pulled bedraggled from a hole in the ground.
Flag of Libya's National Transitional Council flying at the United Nations in Vienna
"For the past seven months, you have fought courageously for your fundamental rights and freedoms. Women and young people were in the vanguard, demanding a say in the political and socio-economic life of their country. As you look to the future, I want you to know that the United Nations will support you in every way we can".
The NTC halts fire to allow the Red Cross to deliver vital medical aid - video
The NTC halts fire to allow the Red Cross to deliver vital medical aid to the besieged city of Sirte. Lily Grimes reports.
Libya mass grave discovered near Misrata
Whoever buried the five men, discovered on Wednesday in graves a little way outside the Libyan coastal city of Misrata, had a sense of order.
Libyans say Gadhafi hometown could fall in days
Libyan military officials said Wednesday that revolutionary forces could capture Moammar Gadhafi's hometown of Sirte within days.
NTC discovers two mass graves containing up to 900 bodies near Tripoli
Libya’s new rulers have discovered two mass graves containing the bodies of as many as 900 people who had “died not long ago,” reporters on the scene said on Wednesday.


Day 231 October 6

Red Cross brings aid to Gadhafi hometown in Libya
The international Red Cross delivered baby milk, diapers and other humanitarian aid to civilians in Moammar Gadhafi's besieged hometown on Thursday, seeking to ease shortages amid rapidly deteriorating conditions.
Kadhafi diehards bid to break Sirte siege
Intense fighting raged in Sirte on Thursday after forces loyal to Moamer Kadhafi tried to break a siege of the ousted strongman's hometown by fighters loyal to Libya's new regime.
Gaddafi warns developing world leaders of similar fate
Deposed leader Muammar Gaddafi said leaders of the developing world who recognised Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC)that ousted him with the aid of NATO firepower would suffer a similar fate.
NTC sends reinforcements to Bani Walid
"We are heading for the southern front of Bani Walid," 170 kilometres southeast of Tripoli, Yunes said, referring to a column of 1,000 men and hundreds of vehicles.
Sniper fire holds up push into Gaddafi's hometown
Anti-Gaddafi fighters on Thursday had advanced just over one kilometre (miles) into Sirte from the luxury hotel on the Mediterranean shore that had earlier marked the front line.
Another Mass Grave Discovered in Tripoli
They believe that at least 200 bodies have been buried, and locals residents say they are possibly corpses that were found on the streets after deadly clashes that occurred at the end of August this year.
NTC forces capture area in Bani Walid
Meanwhile, revolutionary fighters still battling to remove the last bastions of Gadhafi's forces were able to wrest control of strategic posts in the hills of Bani Walid.
Iraq offers advice to Libyan leader on democracy
Iraq's prime minister offered to help Libya, a country with a shared history of dictatorship, build its fledgling democracy during a meeting Thursday with Libya's visiting prime minister, said an Iraqi spokesman.


Day 232 October 7

Mugabe warns against Libya-style uprising
PRESIDENT Robert Mugabe Thursday said the Arab Spring could have been avoided if the countries' leaders had “read” the situation properly and warned that Western powers backing the uprisings could target Zimbabwe next.
NATO in Libya: why the alliance is staying
NATO ministers decide to continue the mission in Libya amid concerns that Muammar Qaddafi is still at large and the new leadership council needs continuing help with security.
Libya: wounded patients evacuated from Sirte hospital
The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) evacuated three war-wounded people from Ibn Sina hospital in Sirte to a field hospital on the other side of the front line on 6 October 2011.
Libya at a standstill until Sirte falls
The fighters ran from building to building, ducking as weapons fire came in over the rooftops around them.
Kadhafi hometown rocked by street fighting
Moamer Kadhafi's besieged hometown of Sirte was rocked by heavy street fighting on Friday, as the ex-leader called on Libyans to turn out in their millions to demonstrate against the country's new rulers.
Libya NTC forces take most of Gaddafi stronghold Sirte
Sustained tank and mortar fire has been targeting Sirte and there are huge columns of smoke across the city, some 360km (225 miles) east of Tripoli, with many buildings struck and on fire, says our correspondent.
Sirte assault being conducted without NATO's help
While we wait for news from Peter in Sirte, its worth pointing out that this assault appears to have been conducted without Nato's help.
NATO sees Gaddafi loyalists near defeat in Sirte
Commanders of NATO operations in Libya believe forces loyal to ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi are on the verge of defeat in Sirte, a key milestone for ending alliance military operations, a senior U.S. defense official said.
As final battle rocks Sirte, NTC forces prepare to launch new offensive at Bani Walid
Mussa Ali Yunes, commander of the Jado Brigade, said “we are heading for the southern front of Bani Walid,” speaking of a column of 1,000 men and hundreds of vehicles.
Is this the beginning of the end in Libya?
Nearly three weeks into their assault on Muammar Gaddafi’s hometown of Sirte, the revolutionaries launched their first coordinated attack on the city proper, sending hundreds of trucks and men on foot pushing from strategic points into the city.
Libyan fighters assault main Gadhafi base in Sirte
The forces of Libya's new rulers were pushing into the Mediterranean coastal city from the west, east and south in heavy fighting, trying to squeeze Gadhafi loyalists into a smaller and smaller perimeter. The two sides battered each other with rockets, mortar shells and tank fire, as Gadhafi snipers fired down on fighters advancing through housing complexes. Friday's push marks the largest new assault on the city for weeks.
Put poisonous speech on the back burner
GRANDSTANDING as well as the peddling of hate speech by politicians should be deplored. Throughout the Libyan revolution, the former strongman Muammar Gaddafi used crude language –– such as rats, infidels and so forth –– to try to portray the rebels as usurpers, amateurs, thieves, robbers and anarchists, whose brief was to make Libya an Italian colony again. Sounds familiar?



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 98 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (81 comments) | Recommend (<0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Wed Oct 05th 2011, 08:15 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 33 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


One of the wonderful things that is happening in Libya is that Libyans are finally free to express themselves. This is showing up in many ways, but I'm truly amazed by the graffiti and murals being painted all over the city.

Photo: KhadijaTeri



Day 228 October 3

Libyan graffiti artists make fun of Gadhafi
Libyan graffiti artists are taking advantage of newfound freedom to make fun of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi on the streets of Tripoli.
Compassionate care, national pride sustain injured Libyans’ spirits
Despite injuries and homesickness, Libyan fighters currently convalescing in Jordanian hospitals said they are receiving excellent care and are proud of what their country has accomplished.
Nato: 'Very little we can do in Sirte' - audio
The UN's Baroness Amos describes conditions for residents trying to escape the Libyan city of Sirte and Nato spokesman Col Roland Lavoie explains its role in the battle for the city.
Egypt volunteer in Libya wants Qaddafi 'dead or alive'
He protested peacefully in Cairo's Tahrir Square to topple Hosni Mubarak but on the front line in Sirte he is fighting to capture Libya's fugitive strongman Moamer Qaddafi "dead or alive."
Anti-Gaddafi commander says targeting Gaddafi's son
Colonel Hamed Al-Hasi, commander of the anti-Gaddafi Qatar brigade east of Sirte, said the truce had expired on Sunday, but a full assault was still out of the question.
Many in Surt, Libya, don't trust revolutionary forces
Reporting from Surt, Libya— As fighters loyal to Libya's revolutionary government gain on the holdout city of Surt, residents are making it clear that the battle for hearts and minds is far from won.
African migrants evacuated from Libya to Chad
More than 1,200 African migrants who have been stuck in the southern Libyan desert town of Sabha for weeks in dire conditions have been evacuated and are on their way to Chad, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) said on Monday.
Red Cross convoy turns back after heavy fire prevents it from reaching center of Sirte
But a Reuters team who witnessed the incident said they saw no incoming fire from the Gaddafi loyalists inside Sirte.
Libya's post-Gadhafi rulers name new Cabinet
Libya's transitional leaders named a new Cabinet Monday and said they would step down after the country is fully secured, putting an end to weeks of political infighting as the North African nation struggles to get back on its feet.
For Sirte wounded, frontline triage comes in a mosque
On one side of the one-room mosque is a clock showing both local and Mecca time, and a stack of Korans.
Chilly welcome for freedom fighters in Gaddafi's town
The people here -- many of them members of Gaddafi's own Gaddadfa tribe -- appeared to have left in a hurry. At one house visited by Reuters, glasses had been left with tea still in them.
Libya's NTC lowers bar for starting election process
Libya's new rulers will set in motion the process of democratic elections once Muammar Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte is captured, instead of waiting until the whole country is under their control, the caretaker prime minister said on Monday.
Gadaffi Billions of Dollars in accounts abroad. Why didnt you build roads in Libya first - video
This is a video illustrating the state of some of Libya's roads, which is reported to be a common occurance
Tripoli military chief says militias must pull out
The military commander of Tripoli, a key figure in the revolution that overthrew Muammar Gaddafi, called on other militias to pull their weapons out of Tripoli, accusing them of terrorising the city's population.
Family tells of terror from armed Gadhafi loyalists in Sirte
"Muatassim's communications operation inside Sirte put out word that any family leaving could be shot, even the women and children," Sumaya Tarhouni said.


Day 229 October 4

Gaddafi's migrant invasion plan revealed
"When NATO said there was a no-fly zone, after that Gaddafi caught in the street and took them by bus and put them on a boat and sent them to Europe," said Abdul Bost, a harbour official. "Some people were jumping from the boats and swimming back."
Humanitarian fears grow over Libya Sirte battle
Libyan interim government forces have captured a district in Sirte after fierce battles that further raised concern about the dire humanitarian situation in Muammar Gaddafi's besieged hometown.
Freed American journalist reported fighting alongside revolutionaries at Sirte
Meanwhile, the revolution gained one new fighter, U.S. national Matthew VanDyke. VanDyke is a journalist who was arrested and imprisoned by the Gadhafi regime in March. He was freed by the rebels only after the fall of Tripoli, and he has fought along side them since. Currently, he is with his brothers outside of Sirte.
Amazigh rebels embrace representative of Libyan Jews
David Gerbi, the international relations representative of the World Organization of Libyan Jews, is called “Udai ugrauli” (“the Jewish revolutionary”) by the Amazigh rebel leaders on the Libyan National Transitional Council in the country’s western Jebl Nafusa mountains.
Post-Revolution, Libyan Women Seek Expanded Roles
One recent day in Tripoli, hundreds of people strolled through a charity fundraiser organized by the women in Libya's capital city.
Colonel Gaddafi: And to think we once found this ferocious tyrant funny
If anything positive has emerged from a decade of Middle Eastern wars, it ought to be this: that it has put paid to the glibness with which we had begun to hear news from abroad. It was easy to be cynical about the horrors when so many of their perpetrators were cartoon characters – Saddam in his homburg, Osama in his cave, Muammar in his tent. Gaddafi was the biggest clown of all, and when we sneer at Tony Blair for being taken in, with his "Dear Muammar" letters and world-leader bonhomie, we should perhaps look inside ourselves. How many of us wanted to remember the massacres and tortures when Gaddafi's antics so added to the gaiety of life?
Libyan Rebels Clarify Steps to New Rule
Libya’s provisional leaders said Monday that they would resign once the former rebels defeat the vestiges of armed support for Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi in his home city of Surt, a move that would clear the way for a new interim government that would run the country until elections can be held.


Day 230 October 5

Sean Penn visits ‘inspirational’ Libya
“This is my first visit to inspirational Libya. I am inspired by the Arab Spring and am here to be able to get a sense of what humanitarian aid can be delivered” to the people, Penn told AFP after landing at Benghazi airport.
Volunteers care for sick animals at Gaddafi's menagerie
Flopped in the baking sand, deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's ostrich thrashes wildly, then lays its beak in the dust to die.
Al Jazeera reports on 'final assault' on Sirte - video
In an exclusive interview with Al Jazeera, the commanders leading the battle for Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte, say they have begun a final assault to seize the town.
Libya NTC forces expect to take Sirte in 48 hours
"More than half of the city is under the control of the rebels," said the commander, Adel Al-Hasi. "In two days, God willing, Sirte will be free."
Al Arabiya reports heavy clashes in the center of Sirte
Heavy clashes between Libyan revolutionary fighters and pro-Qaddafi forces in the center of the city of Sirte
On the run, Gaddafi leaves few footprints
Dressed in rags and holding a cellphone, Muammar Gaddafi sits in the shade of an oasis palm in the southern Libyan desert. He gazes wistfully at signs that say "Niger 450 km", "Burkina Faso 2,700 km", "Algiers, 650 km". The cartoon, displayed on an easel in the lobby of Tripoli's Mahari hotel, raises a smile from patrons checking their AK-47 assault rifles and machine pistols in the wooden gun rack behind the security desk.
Gaddafi determined to avoid Saddam Hussein's fate
When Muammar Gaddafi ponders his future from his hideout somewhere in Libya, he will probably recall the fate of another fallen Arab autocrat, Saddam Hussein, pulled bedraggled from a hole in the ground.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution Cyberwar: Gaddafi’s online mercenary army


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 98 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Jamaica (September 29), Somalia (September 30).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (114 comments) | Recommend (<0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sat Oct 01st 2011, 01:54 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 32 part 3 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Fighters loyal to the transitional government drove their vehicle outside a field hospital west of Surt.

Photo: Aris Messinis / Agence France-Presse


Day 224 September 29

Extraordinary argument captured during fresh Sirte assault
Anti-Gaddafi fighters have renewed the battle to capture Sirte with one soldier attempting to use psychological warfare to undermine forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi.
NTC fighters have captured Sirte's port, airport and air base
"We are also controlling north of the city now and our fighters advanced some kilometers from the east side of Sirte. "We won't lose this battle; it's a matter of days."
Libya ‘issues summons’ for Qaddafi’s ex-PM
Libya has issued a summons for Muammar Qaddafi’s former Prime Minister Baghdadi al-Mahmudi, who fled the country for neighboring Tunisia, the interim justice minister said Wednesday.
Girlfriend of Gadafy's son investigated over alleged trafficking of 'escorts'
Talitha van Zon (39), a Dutch former Playboy model who is under investigation in the Netherlands over people-trafficking claims
Libyan Rebels Press Toward Sirte in Hunt for Gadhafi, Sons
Libyan rebel forces pressed again for control of Moammar Gadhafi's hometown of Sirte, which is still held by Gadhafi loyalists. Neil Connery of International Television News reports.
NTC fighters take Sirte airport, plan to hold positions there
Fighters supporting Libya's National Transitional Council say they they are now in control of the airport in Sirte, Muammar Gaddafi's hometown.
Kadafi foes keep up assault on stronghold
Revolutionary forces loyal to Libya's provisional government pressed their assault Wednesday on Moammar Kadafi's hometown, pounding loyalist positions with rockets and mortar fire as plumes of smoke rose from the besieged city.
Libya's tanker fleet seen operational in a month
Libya's state owned oil tanker fleet is set to be back in business within a month, with some vessels ready for trading in the next two weeks after months at anchorage due to war, the country's port authority chief told Reuters on Tuesday.
Amnesty: Libya’s NTC must protect evidence at Abu Salim mass grave site
A mass grave uncovered near Libya’s Abu Salim Prison that could be linked to the 1996 mass killing of prisoners should be secured immediately to protect evidence and ensure accurate identification of the bodies, Amnesty International said today.
Libyan women signal time to end domestic violence
They were in hospitals helping the wounded, they formed support groups for broken families, and they fed men on the frontline. But prior to the revolution domestic violence, harassment as well as street violence had become a part of Libyan culture under the Gaddafi regime.
Normality returning to Libya as schools reopen
At Al-Shaheed Yusif Burahil School in downtown Benghazi the cries of excited boys playing football in the school playground can be heard in the streets outside. It is a sound heard the world over. But not for months in Libya.
4 GOP senators travel to post-Gadhafi Libya
Four Republican senators traveled to Libya on Thursday to meet with the nation's new rulers, the highest-profile American delegation to visit the country since the ouster of longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi.
Tunisia to hold Al-Baghdadi Ali al-Mahmoudi pending extradition to Libya
Tunisian prosecutors have received a request from the new Libyan authorities to extradite Muammar Gaddafi's former prime minister, Al-Baghdadi Ali al-Mahmoudi, and are therefore keeping him in jail, Mahmoudi's lawyer said on Thursday.
Libya to honour deals with foreign firms - central bank
Libya is committed to honouring all deals with foreign firms unless they reveal evidence of corruption, and the country will not impose foreign exchange controls, its central bank governor said on Thursday.
Battles rage for control of Kadhafi hometown
Moamer Kadhafi diehards fought pitched battles Thursday with combatants loyal to Libya's new rulers for control of the ousted despot's birthplace Sirte, with the heaviest fighting at the port.
Libyans working hard to shed 'mad dog' Gadhafi image
Libyans are eager to put the long and strange reign of Moammar Gadhafi behind them, but they say his fugitive status only bolsters the mystique of a ruler who never missed a chance to embarrass them on the world stage. "When we traveled, we stopped saying we're Libyans because everyone on the outside thought we dress in drapes and live in tents," said Amal Emsaed, 20, a student at Tripoli University.
Behind Qatar's Intervention In Libya
Among the many countries that supported Libya's rebels in their fight to unseat Muammar al-Qaddafi, Qatar was a particularly enthusiastic partner. The Arab emirate of just 1.6 million people, rich in oil and gas, was the first Arab country to recognize the rebel government, the Transitional National Council. It sold Libyan oil on behalf of the rebels to avoid sanctions and supplied them with gas, diesel, and millions of dollars in aid. And Al Jazeera, the satellite broadcaster based in Doha, covered the struggle of the Libyan rebels in even greater detail and depth than it has the Arab world's other revolutionary movements.


Day 225 September 30

Libya rules out forex controls
BENGHAZI, Libya: Libya is committed to honoring all deals with foreign firms unless they reveal evidence of corruption, and the country will not impose foreign exchange controls, its central bank governor said.
Libya's planned revision of school curriculum - video
During the 42 years of Colonel Gaddafi's rule, Libya's education system became the testing ground for the many ideological whims of its leader. Libyan students are now returning to their studies and a school curriculum that needs a complete overhaul.
As Libya’s crude output rises, so do oil workers’ expectations
Talk to Libyan oilmen and their message is as optimistic as it is clear: they’re bringing their sector back on stream quickly and are ready to supply the West with its light sweet crude. They’re not wrong
Libya Council Delays Interim Government
Libya may not have a new interim government for weeks or months, said Mahmoud Jibril, prime minister of the nation’s National Transitional Council.
Libya's new UN rep a 'puppet': Venezuela's Chavez
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, one of the last remaining friends of ousted Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi, ridiculed the country's new UN representative Thursday, calling him a "puppet" and a "dummy".
Civilians flee Sirte battle, fighting hampers aid -UN
Civilians fled Sirte on Friday as interim government forces pounded the coastal city in an effort to dislodge fighters loyal to ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi.
Libya endgame carries new risks for NATO
NATO commanders face a tough balancing act during the bloody battle for Muammar Gaddafi's last strongholds, Sirte and Bani Walid.
Snipers halt NTC fight for Kadhafi hometown
Fighters for Libya's new rulers were forced to regroup Friday on the edge of Sirte, as pro-Kadhafi snipers halted a two-week old assault on the ousted despot's hometown.
What’s behind Libya’s fast march to democracy?
In a trip to Libya this month, just weeks after Muammar Qaddafi’s fall, I found peace coming fast to Tripoli, despite continued resistance in several Libyan towns. Ten days ago, families with children mobbed Martyrs’ square, where Qaddafi once held forth, to commemorate the hanging 80 years ago of Libya’s hero of resistance against the Italians, Omar Mukhtar. Elementary schools opened last week. The university will open next month. Water and electricity are flowing. Uniformed police are on the street. Trash collection is haphazard but functioning. This is the fastest post-war recovery I have witnessed: faster than Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq or Afghanistan. Certainly faster than Somalia, Sierra Leone or Rwanda.
Sabha, just recently freed, talks about local elections.
After the liberation of the city of Sabha from the remnants of the tyrant, the need became urgent to form a local council elected in a democratic way to go Amoar the city and as a result of the importance of stage and sensitivity, it is important that the city of Sabha of the cities that provide ideal Mahtdy for the exercise of democracy, which deprived them during the reign of the tyrant Muammar Gaddafi and therefore the time has come for this city held its first legislative elections is the choice of a local council team runs the city in the next phase is which confirms the leadership of the city of Sabha and adds another value in the eyes of the free world.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Video of the convoy sent to take Misrata, clearly shows African mercenaries exploited by Gaddafi to fight his own people.Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 97 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Uganda (September 21), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24), Switzerland (September 29), Somalia (September 30).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (94 comments) | Recommend (<0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Thu Sep 29th 2011, 01:40 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 32 part 2 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Amazigh cultural event and fundraising for the wounded in Tripoli's Martyrs' Square, thousands showed up to support the event.

Photo: Imesli n Tilelli


Day 222 September 27

UCLA kid back from Libya, has home movies
Chris Jeon, the UCLA student who turned up with Libyan rebel fighters last month, is back on campus. He sat for an interview on today's CBS Early Show and shared his personal video footage from his month with the rebels — and reveals them to be fans of, yes, Justin Bieber
Libya plans to abolish state security courts
Libya's new rulers plan to abolish the state security courts used by Muammar Gaddafi to imprison political dissidents, the country's interim justice minister said on Monday.
In Romania, refugees from Libya find oasis of peace
Western Romania has turned into a harbour of peace for nearly 200 refugees who fled persecution, abuse or violence -- many in Libya -- and dream only of "living freely", once resettled in a western country.
Libyan anti-Gadhafi forces take over port in Sirte
"Among the reports emerging from Sirte are executions, hostage-taking and the calculated targeting of individuals, families, and communities within the city," NATO has said. The organization has also pointed to mercenaries being involved on the pro-Gadhafi side and civilians denied access to food, water and medical care.
Libyan rebels encounter fierce fighting and 'dirty tricks' from Gaddafi's troops
Suliman Abdul Mula was not surprised when he saw the white flag waved by a group of Muammar Gaddafi's soldiers caught between western air strikes and the rapid advance of Libya's rebels. "We saw they raised the white flag. We thought they no longer wanted to fight for Gaddafi. They are losing and no one in Libya wants to die for Gaddafi any more," said the 31-year-old. "But when we approached, they opened fire. It was a trick."
‘We had to free our country… even at the cost of our own lives’
Much has been said about the freedom fighters during the Libya uprising. But what could be referred to as freedom flights also played a major role in the revolution. Capt. Ali Sanusi risked his life several times to fly his BAe 146 into the battlefield. Fiona Galea Debono caught up with the heroic commercial pilot on the runway of the Malta International Airshow.
ZAWIYAH - BATTLE SCARS AND MARTYRS STORIES - 26/09/2011
Upon leaving Tripoli for the first time in 7 months, i visited Zawiyah to pay tribute to their efforts of resistance and to reflect on the many lives lost and the many wounds to heal.
Libya envoy wants African states to prevent Gaddafi sabotage
The international community must put pressure on African countries still backing Muammar Gaddafi to ensure the deposed Libyan leader and his family do not sabotage the country's fight for freedom


Day 223 September 28

Libya fighting rages for Gaddafi hometown
At least seven NTC fighters killed in continuing push for Sirte, while offensive in Bani Walid stalls.
Anti-Gaddafi forces capture Sirte's port
Anti-Gaddafi forces overran Sirte's port on Tuesday, scoring a strategic victory in the battle for control of the ousted Libyan leader's birthplace, as instense fighting carried on inside the city.
Libyan official delivers $16 million to southern city
Libya's transitional government delivered 20 million dinars ($16 million) Tuesday to this remote southern city beset by fighters loyal to Moammar Gadhafi, hoping to bolster support for revolutionary forces.
Gaddafi used you and then he ran away
The graffiti on a wall next to a looted grocery store neatly sums up the plight of a small Libyan town whose entire population fled in fear of reprisals by the rebel forces now in power.
NTC fighters killed in Sirte battle
More than 10 fighters of Libya's new rulers were killed on Tuesday in fierce street fighting with forces of Muammar Gaddafi in his hometown of Sirte, a commander told AFP.
NTC fighters appeal for more NATO help after loyalist rocket barrage kills a top commander
The AFP news agency reports that anti-Gaddafi fighters Wednesday appealed for help from NATO after being blasted by rockets fired by loyalist troops in Bani Walid, one of the ousted Libyan leader's last bastions.
Gaddafi hometown a hazardous prize for Libya's NTC
For months the Libyan fighters who toppled Muammar Gaddafi both craved and dreaded the battle for his hometown Sirte. Nearly two weeks of costly fighting have made it clear why.
'Mass Grave' Found Close To Libyan Hotel
The new Libyan authorities claim to have discovered another "mass grave" in Tripoli - close to a hotel at which Western journalists had been forced to stay.
NTC forces find hidden helicopter at Sirte port
In Tripoli, a senior NTC officer said his fighters, on entering Sirte port two days ago, had found and seized a helicopter hidden under camouflage that appeared to have been made ready for a swift departure.
Libyan fighters capture Sirte airport
Forces loyal to interim government say they are in control of the airport in one of last bastions of Gaddafi support
Gadhafi nephew had ‘house of gold’ but didn’t pay maids
Two housemaids managed to escape from Libya with the help of a Filipino labor attaché last week, but two other Filipino househelp have chosen to remain, hoping they would still be paid.
Libya ready to probe possible other Lockerbie suspects
Libya's interim justice minister Mohammed al-Alagi said on Wednesday he was ready to work with Scottish authorities to probe the possible involvement of others in the Lockerbie bombing apart from the sole Libyan convicted for the attack.


Day 224 September 29

Extraordinary argument captured during fresh Sirte assault
Anti-Gaddafi fighters have renewed the battle to capture Sirte with one soldier attempting to use psychological warfare to undermine forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi.
NTC fighters have captured Sirte's port, airport and air base
"We are also controlling north of the city now and our fighters advanced some kilometers from the east side of Sirte. "We won't lose this battle; it's a matter of days."
Libya ‘issues summons’ for Qaddafi’s ex-PM
Libya has issued a summons for Muammar Qaddafi’s former Prime Minister Baghdadi al-Mahmudi, who fled the country for neighboring Tunisia, the interim justice minister said Wednesday.
Girlfriend of Gadafy's son investigated over alleged trafficking of 'escorts'
Talitha van Zon (39), a Dutch former Playboy model who is under investigation in the Netherlands over people-trafficking claims
Libyan Rebels Press Toward Sirte in Hunt for Gadhafi, Sons
Libyan rebel forces pressed again for control of Moammar Gadhafi's hometown of Sirte, which is still held by Gadhafi loyalists. Neil Connery of International Television News reports.
NTC fighters take Sirte airport, plan to hold positions there
Fighters supporting Libya's National Transitional Council say they they are now in control of the airport in Sirte, Muammar Gaddafi's hometown.
Kadafi foes keep up assault on stronghold
Revolutionary forces loyal to Libya's provisional government pressed their assault Wednesday on Moammar Kadafi's hometown, pounding loyalist positions with rockets and mortar fire as plumes of smoke rose from the besieged city.
Behind Qatar's Intervention In Libya
Among the many countries that supported Libya's rebels in their fight to unseat Muammar al-Qaddafi, Qatar was a particularly enthusiastic partner. The Arab emirate of just 1.6 million people, rich in oil and gas, was the first Arab country to recognize the rebel government, the Transitional National Council. It sold Libyan oil on behalf of the rebels to avoid sanctions and supplied them with gas, diesel, and millions of dollars in aid. And Al Jazeera, the satellite broadcaster based in Doha, covered the struggle of the Libyan rebels in even greater detail and depth than it has the Arab world's other revolutionary movements.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 94 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (129 comments) | Recommend (<0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Tue Sep 27th 2011, 07:38 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com Libya, In the Spotlight (AJE)

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 32 part 1 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A Libyan street vendor displays boxing gloves with the colours of the flag of Libya's National Transitional Council at a stall in Tripoli's Marty's Square.

Photo: Getty Images



Day 220 September 25

Libyan NTC says repulsed pro-Gaddafi attack in south
Militias loyal to Libya's deposed leader Muammar Gaddafi attacked the southern town of Ghadames, on the border with Algeria, on Saturday but were pushed back, a spokesman for Libya's interim government said on Sunday.
Libyan forces besiege Gadhafi's hometown Sirte
Libya's revolutionary fighters stepped up a siege of Moammar Gadhafi's hometown on Sunday, hoping to wear down loyalist forces a day after an offensive failed to dislodge die-hard loyalists of the fugitive leader.
Libyan jet's roundels changed in poignant ceremony
A Libyan Air Force Mirage F1 fighter jet had its all-green roundel replaced by the new Libyan colours this morning amid applause at Malta International Airport, where the jet is on static display as part of the Malta Airshow.
Mass grave found near Tripoli prison
A mass grave has been found near Abu Salim prison in the Libyan capital Tripoli containing the remains of 1,200 bodies, Al Jazeera television reportd on Sunday.
NATO bombing missions pound Gaddafi's hometown
NATO bombing raids hammered the Libyan city of Sirte on Sunday to clear the way for fighters with the Libyan interim government who are trying to capture Muammar Gaddafi's hometown.
Libyan fighters reinforce siege of Sirte
Interim government forces set up checkpoints around Gaddafi stronghold and hope to take control by Monday or Tuesday
Libya's last battle may be its toughest
The hilltop desert badlands of Bani Walid could be where Muammar Gaddafi's supporters make their final stand. They could hardly have picked a better place.
Court to hear how Gaddafi and sons raped women
A Benghazi-based psychologist will be asking the International Criminal Court (ICC) to issue arrest warrants against Muammar Gaddafi and his sons after collecting evidence of widespread rape.
African mercenaries roam in Sirte: witness
"I think they are taking revenge," added the man, stressing that almost 80 percent of Sirte's current population is originally from Misrata further west, a bastion of the rebellion against Gaddafi.


Day 221 September 26

Libya's NTC readies new push into Sirte
Fighters backing Libya's interim rulers prepared to renew their advance into the coastal city of Sirte on Monday after NATO aircraft bombed targets in Muammar Gaddafi's home town to sap the resistance of the deposed leader's troops.
Evolution of the frontlines in Libya (PDF)
NATO has created a page showing how the territory held by opposing sides has changed over time.
Interview with the Libyan pilots who refused Gaddafi orders to bomb Benghazi - video
This is an interview with Libyan pilots who refuses Gaddafi orders to bomb Benghazi and fled with their jet, defecting
Gaddafi and family 'among the poorest citizens' claims spokesman Moussa Ibrahim
Muammar Gaddafi's chief spokesman said on Sunday the deposed Libyan leader and his family had not helped themselves to Libya's oil wealth and that they were "among the poorest citizens".
Guardian: Libyan government seeks Algerian answers over cross-border attack
The provisional government in Tripoli will ask Algeria to explain how pro-Gaddafi forces crossed the border to attack its forces on Saturday, the Libyan army chief spokesman has said. Eight were killed in the attack near Ghadames.
Phone call intercepted between Gaddafi sons Mutasim in Sirte and Saif in Bani Walid
Colonel Ahmed Bani, the NTC military spokesman, revealed that Libyan forces had intercepted a telephone conversation between Gaddafi's sons Mutasim, his national security adviser, organising the fighting inside Sirte, and Saif al-Islam, in Bani Walid south of Tripoli
Libya: forces close in on Sirte despite fresh attacks from Gaddafi loyalists
Nato order halt to fighting to destroy artillery of Gaddafi loyalists, as mass grave of 1,270 bodies discovered in Tripoli
American woman, husband holed up in a mosque on Sirte front line
She's an American who grew up in Illinois, she's three months pregnant, and she's not quite sure how she and her Libyan husband got to be holed up in a mosque right on the frontline in Muammar Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte.
Italy's Eni: Oil production resumes in Libya
Libya has resumed oil production for the first time since the civil war, tapping 15 wells and producing some 31,900 barrels per day, Italian energy giant Eni said Monday.
Foreign embassies opened in Libya
Here are details of foreign embassies that have re-opened in Libya or will soon: Britian, Canada, France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Poland, Romania, South Korea, Turkey, United States.
Libya's Moussa Ibrahim says was in Sirte on Sunday
The fugitive spokesman for Muammar Gaddafi said on Monday that he was in the ousted leader's hometown of Sirte as it came under attack on Sunday but he refused to comment on Gaddafi's own whereabouts.
Libyan forces close on Gaddafi loyalists in Sirte
Libyan provisional government forces backed by NATO warplanes raced through the eastern outskirts of Sirte on Monday, closing in on Muammar Gaddafi loyalists holed up in one of the last two bastions of the deposed leader.
Libyan NTC Chief Warns Gadhafi Must Be Caught
The head of Libya’s National Transitional Council appealed directly to the U.N. Security Council Monday, asking it to lift the remaining sanctions on Libya so the country could rebuild. Mahmoud Jibril also warned that the stability of Libya will be at risk as long as former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi is on the loose.
British firms eye up Lucrative Libya contracts
Many organisations in Britain are hoping their company might be in line for work because Britain had helped in the war, however, they have been told not to make any assumptions. But companies which have existing contracts will be honoured.
Libyans reclaim their streets
Abdul-Moneim, a 17-year old schoolboy, raises a laugh about why he is shovelling dust and cigarette ends into a wheelbarrow. "I'd had it with Abu Shafshufa" ("frizzyhead" – the universal nickname for Muammar Gaddafi), he grins, shouldering his broom like a rifle. Passers-by nod approvingly. "Well done kids!" calls out a soldier in camouflage gear. Shopkeepers keep the squad supplied with water and snacks.
Pakistanis go in to bat for removing dictator's name and restoring pride to stadium
THE statues cast in gold in his image have been torn down in Tripoli and the paintings of his likeness defaced. But the name Muammar Gaddafi still stands proudly atop one monument, one Libya's rebels will find it difficult to lay their hands on.


Day 222 September 27

UCLA kid back from Libya, has home movies
Chris Jeon, the UCLA student who turned up with Libyan rebel fighters last month, is back on campus. He sat for an interview on today's CBS Early Show and shared his personal video footage from his month with the rebels — and reveals them to be fans of, yes, Justin Bieber
Libya plans to abolish state security courts
Libya's new rulers plan to abolish the state security courts used by Muammar Gaddafi to imprison political dissidents, the country's interim justice minister said on Monday.
In Romania, refugees from Libya find oasis of peace
Western Romania has turned into a harbour of peace for nearly 200 refugees who fled persecution, abuse or violence -- many in Libya -- and dream only of "living freely", once resettled in a western country.
Libyan anti-Gadhafi forces take over port in Sirte
"Among the reports emerging from Sirte are executions, hostage-taking and the calculated targeting of individuals, families, and communities within the city," NATO has said. The organization has also pointed to mercenaries being involved on the pro-Gadhafi side and civilians denied access to food, water and medical care.
Libyan rebels encounter fierce fighting and 'dirty tricks' from Gaddafi's troops
Suliman Abdul Mula was not surprised when he saw the white flag waved by a group of Muammar Gaddafi's soldiers caught between western air strikes and the rapid advance of Libya's rebels. "We saw they raised the white flag. We thought they no longer wanted to fight for Gaddafi. They are losing and no one in Libya wants to die for Gaddafi any more," said the 31-year-old. "But when we approached, they opened fire. It was a trick."
‘We had to free our country… even at the cost of our own lives’
Much has been said about the freedom fighters during the Libya uprising. But what could be referred to as freedom flights also played a major role in the revolution. Capt. Ali Sanusi risked his life several times to fly his BAe 146 into the battlefield. Fiona Galea Debono caught up with the heroic commercial pilot on the runway of the Malta International Airshow.
ZAWIYAH - BATTLE SCARS AND MARTYRS STORIES - 26/09/2011
Upon leaving Tripoli for the first time in 7 months, i visited Zawiyah to pay tribute to their efforts of resistance and to reflect on the many lives lost and the many wounds to heal.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Blue circle indicates siege, blue solid indicates incursion.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 94 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (101 comments) | Recommend (<0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Sun Sep 25th 2011, 05:33 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 31 part 5 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


Libyan fighters drive past buildings in Misurata damaged during battles this year between Libyan rebels and troops loyal to Moammar Kadafi. The western city is known as "Libya's Stalingrad" because of the extended siege it endured.

Photo: Darren Whiteside / Reuters


Day 218 September 23

Gaddafi's ex-premier jailed after fleeing Libya
Libya's neighbour Tunisia jailed Muammar Gaddafi's former prime minister on Thursday, and Libya's new rulers said they were tightening their grip on the desert towns where Gaddafi himself may be hiding.
NATO confident Libya air war to end within three months
NATO can finish its air campaign in Libya within the next three months, the operations commander said Thursday, as remnants of the ousted regime are now isolated in three pockets of the country.
Libya restarts gas output to feed power plants
Libya has restarted its eastern gas fields to feed its large power plants on the Mediterranean, thus reducing the need for diesel after having spent billions of dollars on fuel imports during the seven months of civil war.
Libyan oil flows, foreign workers wait
Scribbled in blue marker in Arabic on the walls of Brega oil terminal of Brega is a message meant to cheer returning workers: "Gaddafi is gone and the place has been checked."
AJE: Battle for Sirte Continues - video
Libyan fighters are entrenched on the outskirts of Sirte's western gates. The city is the hometown and stronghold of the former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.
Libya's NTC captures three southern towns
Escape route for Muammar Gaddafi now cut off, but combat suspended in tough battles for Bani Walid and Sirte.
Accidental Heroes: Britain, France and the Libya Operation
Looking at the wider spectrum of operations from both the NATO and rebel side, this RUSI Interim Campaign Report analyses how the operation progressed and finally succeeded.
Families call on NTC for compensation - video
Many Libyans lost their lives fighting against Muammar Gaddafi's forces during the conflict. Now their families are calling for the National Transitional Council to give them compensation including monthly salaries.
In Libya's new politics, localism may trump tribes
"No To Tribalism," declare the now tattered posters put up by rebels who overthrew Muammar Gaddafi, a defiant riposte to an Arab autocrat who magnified tribal cleavages with a policy of divide and rule.
Kadhafi troops fire on fleeing family convoy
A fighter for Libya's interim government helping desperate residents flee Moamer Kadhafi's hometown was killed on Friday and a packed family car was destroyed when pro-Kadhafi forces fired on their convoy, a local commander said.
Secrets of a 'super-fixer' in Libya
Flanked by two colleagues, a 60-something Englishman quietly worked the lobby of Benghazi's Tibesti Hotel last week, targeting people likely to be the power brokers in a new Libya.
Prime Minister’s first speech to the UN General Assembly
It is an honour to address the United Nations General Assembly for the first time and its a particular honour to do so as such momentous events unfold in the Arab world.
Captured general says Gaddafi moving secretly in southern desert
A captured general loyal to Muammar Gaddafi has said the fugitive Libyan leader was secretly moving around in the southern desert, a commander of the new regime told the AFP news agency on Friday.
Libya restarts gas output
Libya has restarted its eastern gas fields to feed its large power plants on the Mediterranean, thus reducing the need for diesel after having spent billions of dollars on fuel imports during the seven months of civil war.
Journalist tells of Libyan ‘massacre’
“There was no space in the hospital... But only because all the people of the city were there waiting to donate blood. They would stay there all day and night, ready to help anyone who got injured.”
Opinion: Gaddafi guilty of war crimes
I went to Misrata shortly after rebel forces liberated the city in mid-May. Gaddafi’s forces had relentlessly shelled this strategic port city in western Libya for two months. Most of the fighting took place in the center of the town, and journalists were able to report on the city’s destruction. What they weren’t able to document were the atrocities that Gaddafi’s forces committed in the small villages surrounding Misrata.


Day 219 September 24

Misurata, proud of its role in Libya revolt, looks to the future
Despite an urban tableau of wartime destruction, Misurata — an emblem of the uprising against Libya's Moammar Kadafi — has made strides in reclaiming a sense of normality amid the disarray.
Libya returns to world community, Jibril tells U.N.
Libya's de facto Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril told the United Nations on Saturday his country has been reborn after toppling Muammar Gaddafi and appealed for the release of remaining frozen Libyan assets.
30 NTC fighters killed in battle for Bani Walid
Fighting has claimed the lives of 30 interim government fighters in the campaign to capture the Gaddafi bastion of Bani Walid southeast of the Libyan capital, Dr Mabruk Kernaf said on Saturday.
NTC begins Sunday to discuss new, temporary government
Libya's National Transitional Council will hold an urgent meeting Sunday to discuss the formation of an interim government, a senior council member told CNN Friday.
Libyan forces push into Gadhafi's hometown Sirte
The fighters occupied a key roundabout called Zafaran west of the downtown area and said their goal was to occupy two neighborhoods on the western side of the city.
Libyans with no leadership quit Bani Walid front
Many revolutionary fighters are abandoning one of the main fronts in the battle to rout Moammar Gadhafi's loyalists, saying they're not afraid of dying in the face of heavy resistance but are tired of the disorganization and lack of ammunition among their own ranks.
Libya fighters push into Gaddafi bastion
Supported by tanks, heavy artillery and NATO bombing runs, NTC forces have reached the centre of Sirte.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 94 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Chile(September 16), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20), Algeria (September 22), Sweden (September 24), Kenya (September 24).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (121 comments) | Recommend (0 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Fri Sep 23rd 2011, 07:38 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 31 part 4 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A graffiti depicting ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi being thrown into a dustbin written in arabic "Garbage of History", is painted on a wall in Tripoli

Photo: Francois Mori / AP


Day 216 September 21

African Union, South Africa recognise Libya's NTC
The African Union (AU) recognised the National Transitional Council (NTC) as Libya's de facto government on Tuesday, removing another piece of diplomatic support for ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi.
Libyan graffiti artists make fun of Gadhafi
Libyan graffiti artists are taking advantage of newfound freedom to make fun of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi on the streets of Tripoli.
Interim Libya PM expects new gov't in 7-10 days
"I'm not bothered by (the) time ... to bring about national consensus," he said at a meeting on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly. "I expect a government to be formed in the next week to 10 days."
After the cheering, Libyans wary but optimistic
The 28-year-old Errabti grabbed a gun, but he never fired it. Instead, with rebel checkpoints already set up and the city clearly secure, Errabti left the fighters he'd joined and retreated in a mood of triumph to his neighborhood in Tripoli's Old City.
Canada to extend Libya mission by three months, Harper says after UN speech
The Harper government will ask Parliament to extend Canada's military mission in Libya for three more months.
The house that Moammar built--Inside a Gaddafi compound in Tripoli - video
Muammar Gaddafi, the toppled Libyan leader, left behind numerous houses and compounds in Tripoli, Libya's capital, after being ousted from the city by a popular uprising.
Documents found in Libya show SA sent sniper rifles
South Africa once again finds itself front and centre in an arms deal controversy after Human Rights Watch discovered a document in Tripoli that appears to confirm that sniper rifles were exported to Libya in apparent contravention of our arms trading regime.
NATO extends Libya mission for up to 90 days
NATO agreed on Wednesday to extend its air-and-sea campaign in Libya for up to 90 days as the country's new rulers try to dislodge well-armed Gaddafi loyalists holding out in several towns.
What Role Will Islamists Play In Libya?
As Libyans work to form an interim government, some of those competing for power are members of the Muslim Brotherhood, raising fears that Islamist radicals may try to hijack the revolution. But many Libyans say those fears are mostly in the minds of Westerners.
For Libyans, rows of photos of the dead recall their sad history
Portraits of the dead cover every wall around the main plaza in the coastal city of Benghazi, the cradle of the revolt against Moammar Gadhafi. This makeshift memorial to the victims of Gadhafiês 42-year rule is a place where Benghazi families can, for the first time, share their private heartbreak with the wider community.
Libya: Sub-Saharan migrants keep their heads down
In an abandoned port on the outskirts of Tripoli, a young woman timidly peeks out from behind the blanket that forms a wall in her improvised home. She is one of hundreds of migrants who have gathered in this makeshift camp since a popular uprising to overthrow dictator Muammar Gaddafi spread to the Libyan capital in August.
Op Ed: Libya’s revolution & wealth – a blessing or a curse?
I was 17 years old, when I felt I had no choice but to leave Libya and seek education and life abroad. Life in Tripoli was stifling. To survive let alone thrive you had to fall into line and sing the praises of “the brother leader” and his green book.


Day 217 September 22

Libya rulers say they seize Gaddafi desert outposts, find chemical weapons
Libya's interim rulers said on Wednesday they had captured one of Muammar Gaddafi's last strongholds deep in the Sahara desert, finding chemical weapons, and largely taken control of another.
Gaddafi arms dealings hit China's image badly
THE news that officials of Muammar Gaddafi's regime held secret talks in Beijing to buy weapons in July -- five months after the Security Council imposed an arms embargo on Libya -- is deeply embarrassing for China and casts doubt on its sincerity regarding honouring United Nations sanctions resolutions for which it voted.
NTC official: At least 16 civilians executed by Gaddafi forces in Bani Walid
"They were killed in cold blood. They were all civilians and they were killed execution-style," he said.
NTC lays out timeline to form new government
After liberation, the NTC will create an interim government by appointing a prime minister who will be responsible for forming the government.
Libyan transition council head recalled as 'bright guy' at Pitt
"This is a very tolerant, open-minded individual," Mr. Rockman said. "If the other people in the leadership are a lot like him, this could have a pretty happy ending."
Anti-Gaddafi civilians 'executed in Sirte'
An NTC commander on the outskirts of Sirte, separately showed Reuters a handwritten list of families whose members were said to have been executed in Sirte.
The Surreal Ruins of Qaddafi’s Never-Never Land
On the evening of Aug. 23, during the final hours of the battle for Tripoli, a 26-year-old lawyer named Mustafa Abdullah Atiri was lying, exhausted, against the back wall of a filthy tin-roofed warehouse crammed with 150 prisoners. He had been beaten and tortured every day since Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s soldiers arrested him four days earlier. It was just after the muezzin’s first call to evening prayer — about 10 minutes before 8 — when a pair of guards walked to the door, raised their AK-47 rifles and began spraying the men with bullets. Another guard threw a grenade into the densely packed crowd.
Libya's main university prepares new term for a new dawn
No one seems to mind that term is starting late at Tripoli University this year. It's not every summer vacation, after all, that records the triumph of a revolution, and there are problems to sort out – not least the huge number of young men toting machine guns on campus – before the students start streaming in past the "down with Gaddafi" and "Free Libya" slogans.


Day 218 September 23

Gaddafi's ex-premier jailed after fleeing Libya
Libya's neighbour Tunisia jailed Muammar Gaddafi's former prime minister on Thursday, and Libya's new rulers said they were tightening their grip on the desert towns where Gaddafi himself may be hiding.
NATO confident Libya air war to end within three months
NATO can finish its air campaign in Libya within the next three months, the operations commander said Thursday, as remnants of the ousted regime are now isolated in three pockets of the country.
Libya restarts gas output to feed power plants
Libya has restarted its eastern gas fields to feed its large power plants on the Mediterranean, thus reducing the need for diesel after having spent billions of dollars on fuel imports during the seven months of civil war.
Libyan oil flows, foreign workers wait
Scribbled in blue marker in Arabic on the walls of Brega oil terminal of Brega is a message meant to cheer returning workers: "Gaddafi is gone and the place has been checked."
AJE: Battle for Sirte Continues - video
Libyan fighters are entrenched on the outskirts of Sirte's western gates. The city is the hometown and stronghold of the former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.
Libya's NTC captures three southern towns
Escape route for Muammar Gaddafi now cut off, but combat suspended in tough battles for Bani Walid and Sirte.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 90 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (89 comments) | Recommend (+1 votes)
Posted by joshcryer in General Discussion
Wed Sep 21st 2011, 07:41 AM
Links to sites with updates: AJE Libya Live Blog AJE Twitter Dashboard The Guardian Reuters Telegraph feb17.info Libya Alhurra (live video webcast from Benghazi) Libya Alhurra archives and updates Benghazi Free Radio, in Arabic (may have translators present at times) Tribute FM (English broadcast from Benghazi) libyafeb17.com

Twitter links: Ayman Mohyeldin, with AJE Ben Wedeman, with CNN tripolitanian, a Libyan from Tripoli Brian Conley, reporter in Libya FreeLibyanYouth, Libyan advocate LibyaFeb17.com twitter account ChangeInLibya, Libyan advocate Sofyan Amry (arrived in Benghazi recently) KiloFoot (general Arab Spring news aggregation)

Useful links: feb17voices Current time in Libya Prayer times in Libya

Week 31 part 3 here.

The Oppressive Laws of Gaddafi's Libya
The government grants the right of association to official institutions by virtue of Law 71 of 1972, which regulates associational activity in Libya. Law 20 of 1991 on the Promotion of Freedom sanctions the death penalty for anyone whose continued existence would lead to the disintegration of Libyan society. The Code of Honor of March 1997 institutes a system of collective punishment for wrongdoing, whereby families, towns and municipalities are held responsible for the actions of individuals in their midst and are subject to punishment such as the dissolution of the local People's Congress or the denial of government services, including utilities, water, infrastructure projects. Associations engaging in political activity are illegal in Libya. Further, political activity is defined by Articles 2 and 3 of Law 71 of 1972 as any activity based on a political ideology contrary to the principles of the Al-Fateh Revolution of September 1, 1969. The Law on Publications, No. 76 of 1972, as modified by Law 120 of 1972 and Law 75 of 1973, govern the operation of the press, reserving all rights to publish.


This is what the Libyan freedom fighters are fighting against. Each and every one, when they went into this, knew that it was all or nothing, they had no choice but to fight. For their very survival.

Marching On in Libya, for the revolutionaries!


A graffiti depicting ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi being thrown into a dustbin written in arabic "Garbage of History", is painted on a wall in Tripoli

Photo: Francois Mori / AP


Day 214 September 19

Tony Blair 'visited Libya to lobby for JP Morgan'
Tony Blair used visits to Libya after he left office to lobby for business for the American investment bank JP Morgan, The Daily Telegraph has been told.
Libyans fail to agree on new government
Libya's interim leaders failed to agree a new cabinet on Sunday in the latest setback to attempts to normalise the running of a government still bogged down by battles with pro-Muammar Gaddafi forces
Defected pilots get warm welcome Tripoli - video
Two Libyan air force pilots made a joyful return to Tripoli. They have been out of the country since February. They say they were given orders to bomb anti-government protesters but, horrified, they chose to defect instead and flew to Malta.
NATO to end combat operation in Libya
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization will end its combat operation and transfer power in Libya within the next 3 months, officials say.
Gulf likely to trim oil output as Libya recovers
Gulf OPEC countries will likely gradually decrease their output as Libya's production recovers towards pre-war levels after raising output to compensate for the Libyan loss, the oil group's Libyan Secretary General Abdullah al-Badri said on Monday.
Libyan Provisional Authority Facing Stalled Military, Political Efforts
Libya's provisional authority is facing military and political challenges, as fighters have met continued resistance in former leader Moammar Gadhafi's remaining strongholds and National Transitional Council leaders have delayed announcing a new government.
Who is Abdel Hakim Belhaj? - video
In Libya, new figures are emerging in political and military circles during this transitional period; some even command wide appeal.
OPEC recognises NTC as Libyan representative
The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries now recognises Libya's National Transitional Council as its OPEC representative, the oil group's Secretary General Abdullah al-Badri said on Monday.
Firm sold Gaddafi stealth 4X4
A French company provided Libya in 2008 with a specialised 4X4 designed to protect Muammar Gaddafi while he travelled, and the French presidency signed off on the deal, Mediapart reported online on Sunday.
Total CEO eyes Libyan business expansion
Total SA is in talks with Libya's interim leaders about expanding its business in the North African country, the French oil major's chief executive told a German newspaper.
China calls for early establishment of Libyan interim government
China on Monday called for an early establishment of the Libyan interim government.
Libya’s NTC denies abuse of black Africans
GENEVA: Libya’s National Transitional Council pledged Monday to treat well foreigners accused of fighting for ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi, and denied that anti-Gadhafi fighters had committed systematic abuse of Africans. Throughout the uprising against Gadhafi’s 42-year rule, his opponents have accused Gadhafi of hiring fighters from countries such as Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Mali and Sudan. That has led to fears of mistreatment of blacks now that the former rebels are in charge.
Relishing liberty, Libyans protest at new rulers
Clasping placards and standing in a neat line, a dozen men and women staged a protest against Libya's new rulers on Monday in what they said could be Tripoli's first public demonstration critical of the authorities who toppled Muammar Gaddafi.
Libya revolution filters slowly to desert towns
The tumultuous change of power in far-off Tripoli was for weeks little more than a rumor in this small sun-baked town deep in Libya's desert, its news brought in by travelers down the long, desolate ribbon of highway that links Schwerif to the outside world.


Day 215 September 20

Libya: Civilians flee Sirte amid battle
Pro-Gaddafi fighters had shot dead those who tried to escape, people said. Families fleeing the city Monday confirmed that pro-Gaddafi forces had prevented their exit since the transitional government's forces advanced on the city.
NTC claims humanitarian disaster in Gadhafi stronghold
Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi are creating a humanitarian disaster in Bani Walid, the National Transitional Council's military spokesman charged Monday.
Relief for family as they escape Bani Walid - video
One family escaped from the town after Gaddafi troops entered the town after the fall of Tripoli.
Libya: Deaf rebels fight for rights
Special unit of 86 deaf soldiers battles against Gaddafi forces and wins new respect
From Abu Salim to Mater Dei
One of the Libyans receiving medical treatment in Malta spent his summer in Tripoli’s notorious Abu Salim prison and was the fifth to break free when the city was finally liberated last month.
Libya: Transitional Government Should Support Victims
“The NTC has a duty to investigate allegations of sexual assault and to ensure that these claims are not buried,” said Liesl Gerntholtz, women’s rights director at Human Rights Watch. “Some brave women and men have come forward and talked to us, despite the stigma of rape in Libya. They and others deserve to see justice served.”


Day 216 September 21

African Union, South Africa recognise Libya's NTC
The African Union (AU) recognised the National Transitional Council (NTC) as Libya's de facto government on Tuesday, removing another piece of diplomatic support for ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi.
Libyan graffiti artists make fun of Gadhafi
Libyan graffiti artists are taking advantage of newfound freedom to make fun of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi on the streets of Tripoli.
Interim Libya PM expects new gov't in 7-10 days
"I'm not bothered by (the) time ... to bring about national consensus," he said at a meeting on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly. "I expect a government to be formed in the next week to 10 days."
After the cheering, Libyans wary but optimistic
The 28-year-old Errabti grabbed a gun, but he never fired it. Instead, with rebel checkpoints already set up and the city clearly secure, Errabti left the fighters he'd joined and retreated in a mood of triumph to his neighborhood in Tripoli's Old City.
Canada to extend Libya mission by three months, Harper says after UN speech
The Harper government will ask Parliament to extend Canada's military mission in Libya for three more months.
The house that Moammar built--Inside a Gaddafi compound in Tripoli - video
Muammar Gaddafi, the toppled Libyan leader, left behind numerous houses and compounds in Tripoli, Libya's capital, after being ousted from the city by a popular uprising.
Documents found in Libya show SA sent sniper rifles
South Africa once again finds itself front and centre in an arms deal controversy after Human Rights Watch discovered a document in Tripoli that appears to confirm that sniper rifles were exported to Libya in apparent contravention of our arms trading regime.
Libya: Sub-Saharan migrants keep their heads down
In an abandoned port on the outskirts of Tripoli, a young woman timidly peeks out from behind the blanket that forms a wall in her improvised home. She is one of hundreds of migrants who have gathered in this makeshift camp since a popular uprising to overthrow dictator Muammar Gaddafi spread to the Libyan capital in August.
Op Ed: Libya’s revolution & wealth – a blessing or a curse?
I was 17 years old, when I felt I had no choice but to leave Libya and seek education and life abroad. Life in Tripoli was stifling. To survive let alone thrive you had to fall into line and sing the praises of “the brother leader” and his green book.



Click here for updated map. The size of the circles show population, the color represents control, red for FFs, green for tyrants. Animated gif is retired.


A topic on the women of the revolution, dispels myths about the treatment of women in Benghazi.

Videos to bring the Libyan Revolution into context
The Battle of Benghazi. BBC Panorama on Libya Part 1, and Part 2. Video of the convoy sent to take Benghazi, taken from a dead soliders cell phone (shows how massive the operation was). Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire. Tea of Freedom Song. Libya: Part 2 - The Uprising Benghazi - Backbone of the Libyan revolution


March 10 7:28pm Saif al Islam Gaddafi says "the time has come for full-scale military action" against Libyan rebels. He goes on to say that Libyan forces loyal to his family "will never surrender, even if western powers intervene".


As of this week the National Trasitional Council has been formally recognized by 90 countries. France (March 10), Qatar (March 28), Maldives (April 3), Italy (April 4), Kuwait (April 13), The Gambia (April 22), Jordan (April 24), Sengal (April 28), The United Kingdom (June 4), Spain (June 8), Australia (June 9), UAE (June 12), Germany (June 13), Canada (June 14), Panama (June 14), Austria (June 18), Latvia (June 20), Denmark (June 22), Bulgaria (June 28), Croatia (June 28), Turkey (July 3), Poland (July 9), Netherlands (July 13), Belgium (July 13), Luxembourg (July 13), United States (July 15), Japan (July 15), Albania (July 18), Slovenia (July 20), Montenegro (July 21), Portugal (July 28), Botswana (August 11), Gabon (August 12), Tunisia (August 20), New Zealand (August 22), Egypt (August 22), Jordan (August 22), Morocco (August 22), Colombia (August 22), Oman (August 23), Bahrain (August 23), Nigeria, Malta (August 23), Iraq (August 23), Greece (August 23), Norway (August 23), Lebanon (August 23), South Korea (August 24), Sudan (August 24), Hungary (August 24), Chad (August 24), Ethipia (August 24), Burkina Faso (August 24), Colombia (August 25), Serbia (August 25), Bosnia andHerzegovina (August 25), Mongolia (August 25), Djibouti (August 25), Cote d'Ivoire (August 25), Macedonia (August 25), Cyprus (August 26), Malaysia (August 26), Rwanda (August 26), Estonia (August 26), Benin (August 26), Niger (August 27), Togo (August 27), Guinea (August 28), Czech Republic (August 29), Philippines (August 30), Slovakia (August 30), Russia (September 1), Finland (September 1), Romania (September 1), Ukraine (September 1), Azerbaijan (September 2), Botswana (September 2), Kazakhstan (September 5), Central African Republic (September 5), Comoros (September 6), Seychelles (September 7), Ghana (September 9), China (September 12), Afghanistan (September 13), Vietnam (September 14), Costa Rica (September 16), India (September 17), Iran (September 18), South Africa (September 20).

"One month ago (Western countries) were sooo nice, so nice like pussycats," Saif says in a contemptuous sing-song tone."Now they want to be really aggressive like tigers. (But) soon they will come back, and cut oil deals, contracts. We know this game." - Saif Gaddafi


(Yeah, Saif, as if you weren't "cutting oil deals, contracts" with western states. Who are the 'tigers' now? Bombing your own people.)

The first free public opinion poll ever conducted in Libya reveals clues to Eastern Libyan sentiments
* 98 percent of the respondents do not support the division of Libya as a part of the political solution for the current conflict with the Gaddafi regime. Around 95 percent also don't see any role for Gaddafi or his sons in a transitional period, and think it is impossible to implement any political reform in Libya if Gaddafi or one of his sons stays in power

* Around 96 percent of those polled, believe that the 17th of February revolution can consolidate the national unity of Libya and support the model of a democratic Libya based on a constitution which respects human rights

* Al-Qaeda has not played any role in the 17th of February revolution, say 94 percent of the Eastern Libyans, and 91 percent thinks it's impossible for Al-Qaeda to play any political role in the new Libya

* The National Transitional Council is seen by 92 percent of those surveyed as "expressing the views and wishes of Libyans for change"


This is equivalent to 17% the entire population of Libya, doing the numbers very conservatively.


A Legal War: The United Nations Participation Act and Libya
The above link is to an overview of why Obama's implementation of the NFZ and R2P is perfectly legal under the law. I will not post it entirely here, however, all objections come down to the misinformed position that Obama, by using forces in Libya, was invoking Article 43 of the United Nations. This is wrong. Obama invoked Article 42, which does not require congressional approval to implement. Proof of this is that Article 43 has never been used.

It goes like this: The US law (Title 22, Chap. 7, Subchap. XIV 287d) grants the President the right to invoke UN Article 42 without authorization, the War Powers Act (Title 50, Chap. 33 1541) grants the President permission to act without authorization under "specific statutory authorization" which, by definition, is what 287d does. 1543 of the War Powers Act requires the President to report to Congress, which he did. One can argue all day and night about the legality of the War Powers Act, doesn't change the fact that under the law as it is written, the President acted within the law.






Mohammed Nabbous, killed by Gaddafi's forces while trying to report on the massacre in Benghazi

"I'm not afraid to die, I'm afraid to lose the battle" -Mohammed Nabbous, a month ago when all this began


I'm struggling to come up with something to say about this man. I was not aware of the Libyan uprising until I saw Mo's first report, begging for help, posted here on DU. I was stricken. Here was a man giving everything he had to explain a situation that clearly terrified him, I would not call him a coward in that moment, but you could see the fear in his eyes, and desperation in his voice. For 30 days Nabbous would spend many hours covering the uprising in Benghazi. For many nights I would go to sleep with the webcast of Benghazi live on my computer screen, looking to it occasionally to be sure it was still 'there.' Mo treated the chat room as if we were his friends, and in some way, we were. I never signed up to LiveStream to thank him for all his work and it seems somewhat shallow to do so now, given that I was a lurker for so long. Ever since I took over posting these threads "Libya Alhurra" has been linked as a source of information. It wasn't until last night, when I posted, and twitter posted on Mo's adventures out into Benghazi to try to determine the truth of the situation, that Mo's webchannel became a hit, over 2000 people were watching him stream live. This was curious to him because he'd done many reports like this in the past but he appeared somewhat bemused that the view count exploded as it did. Last night Mo became a star. This is a man who first started out with a webcast replete with fear and desperation finally overcoming that aspect of himself and losing that fear, to become someone who was a fighter for the resistance just as much as those who held the guns. Reporting on the front lines of Benghazi became his final act, and for that he should never, ever be forgotten. I'm so sorry Mo that I never got to know you better.

Arab Awakening: Libya: Through the Fire is a documentary about Mo's last days, please watch it.

Mo's first report, which many of you may remember, begging for help.

Mo leaves behind a wife and a newborn child she had this to say about the No Fly Zone and R2P UN resolution:

We started this in a pure way, but he turned it bloody. Thousands of our men, women, and children have died. We just wanted our freedom, that's all we wanted, we didn't want power. Before, we could not do a single thing if it was not the way he wanted it. All we wanted was freedom. All we wanted was to be free. We have paid with our blood, with our families, with our men, and we're not going to give up. We are still going to do that no matter what it takes, but we need help. We want to do this ourselves, but we don't have the weapons, the technology, the things we need. I don't want anyone to say that Libya got liberated by anybody else. If NATO didn't start moving when they did, I assure you, I assure you, half of Benghazi if not more would have been killed. If they stop helping us, we are going to be all killed because he has no mercy anymore.


Read entry | Discuss (102 comments) | Recommend (+3 votes)
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