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pnorman's Journal
Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Mon Jan 02nd 2012, 01:32 AM
n/t
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Sat Dec 31st 2011, 06:15 AM
By that time, he had already come under the avuncular sway of Lemuel Boulware, GE's VP in charge of Industrial Relations (aka: union-busting).

Otherwise, the phrase itself is a valid one and may well be echoed by some modern day Republicans.
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Tue Dec 27th 2011, 11:46 AM
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Posted by pnorman in Editorials & Other Articles
Tue Dec 27th 2011, 10:21 AM
I once tried to write an article, perhaps rather straining for effect, describing the experience as too much like living for four weeks in the atmosphere of a one-party state. "Come on," I hear you say. But by how much would I be exaggerating? The same songs and music played everywhere, all the time. The same uniform slogans and exhortations, endlessly displayed and repeated. The same sentimental stress on the sheer joy of having a Dear Leader to adore. As I pressed on I began almost to persuade myself. The serried ranks of beaming schoolchildren, chanting the same uplifting mush. The cowed parents, in terror of being unmasked by their offspring for insufficient participation in the glorious events…. "Come on," yourself. How wrong am I"
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Wed Dec 21st 2011, 02:47 PM
I thought I had bookmarked it, but apparently didn't! thanks!
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Wed Dec 21st 2011, 05:01 AM
n/t
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Wed Dec 21st 2011, 04:46 AM
THANKS!
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Thu Dec 15th 2011, 05:52 PM


Thanks!
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Wed Dec 14th 2011, 03:38 PM
n/t
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Posted by pnorman in General Discussion
Sat Dec 10th 2011, 03:04 AM
The Farmers Holiday Association, active from 1932 to 1937, served as the nominal organization behind a protest movement by mostly midwestern and Great Plains farmers in reaction to more than ten years of depressed farm income. During World War I farmers met increased worldwide demand for food by increasing their farm sizes and mechanizing their operations. Both strategies proved to be problematic following the post-World War I crash of the farm economy that occurred when foreign markets contracted and wartime price controls ended. After a decade of neglect by the major political parties, many farmers looked to protest movements and third parties as the Great Depression compounded their economic difficulties.

The Farmers Holiday Association grew out of the National Farmers Union, an organization that lobbied for farm aid and tariff reform, as well as operating purchasing and sales cooperatives. The name referred to the famous "Bank Holiday," farmers noting that if bankers could take a holiday to reorder their business, they should be allowed to do the same. The National Farmers Union and the Farmers Holiday Association remained closely linked, in part because the primary leader of the Farmers Holiday Association, Milo Reno, had also been the head of the Iowa Farmers Union. Milo Reno remained central to the organization well past its peak in 1933, and the Iowa chapter was the strongest and most active branch of the organization. Although the organization was national, it received greatest support in the Upper Midwest and Northern Great Plains: Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, South Dakota, and North Dakota drew the largest number of followers. Each state chapter acted independently. In Nebraska, the Communist Party attempted to gain some degree of control, but despite considerable activity and media exposure, it had only limited influence.

Most members owned property or had recently become tenants. Association members never constituted a majority of farmers in any region, which weakened their position and virtually guaranteed conflict with their neighbors. The core concept of the movement, cost of production, centered on the belief that farmers must make a profit on their commodities. In an era when many commodities sold for less than they cost to produce, this idea had obvious appeal. Under the system proposed by the Farmers Holiday Association, farmers would be allowed to grow all they wanted, and the federal government would mandate a price high enough to cover the costs of mortgage, seed, equipment, and labor plus guarantee a profit on commodities intended for the domestic market. The government would then sell the surplus on world markets at true market value. Similar ideas, embodied in the McNary-Haugen Bill, failed to win enough support to override President Calvin Coolidge's vetoes in the 1920s. Other positions advocated by the organization included tariff reform and currency inflation.
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http://plainshumanities.unl.edu/encycloped...
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